Xenia Council taps Scrivens to fill vacated seat

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Xenia Council taps Scrivens to fill vacated seat

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UPDATE @ 11 a.m. Jan. 18

This news organization is working to learn more about past criminal cases in Xenia Municipal Court in which Thomas L. Scrivens was the defendant.

ORIGINAL STORY

The man whom Xenia council members picked to fill a vacated seat said he worked on John Glenn’s unsuccessful campaign for the U.S. Presidency in 1984 and has a history of community service. 

Council members voted 4-2 in favor of Thomas L. Scrivens, who is to be sworn in at council’s next meeting Jan. 25. Scrivens was chosen to fill the seat vacated by Sarah Mays, who ran unopposed to serve as mayor in November. 

 “I am a citizen of the city of Xenia and I’ve been involved since 1988 in terms of volunteering and working behind the scenes for the betterment of the city,” said Scrivens, 69, a former Greene County health inspector and local realtor. 

As a council member, Scrivens will earn an annual salary of just over $4,000 and is eligible for the city’s health insurance. 

The other two candidates who were considered were Matt Bennett and Billie Carrico, who was the third top vote-getter in November’s election, edged out by Levi Dean and incumbent Wesley Smith. 

Dean and Councilman Dale Louderback voted against Scrivens’ appointment. 

Louderback said he supported Carrico for the seat because she took the initiative to campaign and run in November’s election. 

“I thought that since voters have already spoken, that she should be the choice,” Louderback said. “Nothing against Mr. Scrivens. I went to school with him. I liked all three candidates, but two of them didn’t take the initiative to run for office. When someone puts their hat in the ring, it’s not only time-consuming, it’s expensive.” 

The city’s charter does not require that a vacant seat go to the next top vote-getter, said Councilman Wesley Smith, who cited Scrivens’ knowledge of city operations and “his long history of serving on boards and commissions” to justify the vote. 

“Mr. Scrivens quite simply had the best interview,” Smith said. “His energy and passion for the city of Xenia will be welcomed.” 

Scrivens said he’s no stranger to politics, recalling his time as deputy campaign manager in John Glenn’s bid for the U.S. presidency. Glenn came in third for the Democratic nomination, behind Walter Mondale and Jesse Jackson. 

Scrivens said he sees three priorities for him on council: Get a grocery store in at the Xenia Towne Square; keep an eye on public monies and avoid “frivolous spending”; and get streets resurfaced. 

“I just want all the citizens to know I’ve been the same all my life and I will still be the same on council. People who know me will tell you that,” he said. 

There are two more years left on Mays’ vacated council seat and Scrivens will need to win the election in November if he wants to finish the remainder of the term, according to Xenia spokesman Lee Warren. Providing he wins in November, Scrivens will then need to run for reelection in 2019 if he wants to serve for the next four-year term.

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