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The Latest: Some Ohio voters say marijuana issue flawed

By The Associated Press

The Associated Press

The latest developments in Ohio's general election as voters decide issues including whether to legalize marijuana.

11 a.m.

Two voters who support marijuana legalization say they voted against Ohio's Issue 3 because they don't like the part creating exclusive growing sites.

Sixty-two-year-old Marty Dvorchak (Duh-vor-CHAK') of Fairfield says he didn't expect to vote against legalizing marijuana when it finally reached the ballot, because he considers it "ridiculous" that marijuana is illegal. But he doesn't like Ohio's issue.

Steve Mosier (MOH'-sher) of Cincinnati also says he doesn't like the way the Ohio initiative is structured. He expects marijuana will eventually be legal, saying it's less destructive to society than alcohol or cigarettes.

Twenty-two-year-old University of Cincinnati student Natalie McClorey says she doesn't like the grower part, but voted "yes" because it's progress. She thinks most students would vote the same — if they'll go out and vote.

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10:15 a.m.

Election officials in two of Ohio's counties say lines of voters dwindled some after an early wave of Ohioans who cast their ballots early in the state's general election.

An elections board official in Ohio's most populous county says voting in Cuyahoga County slowed later Tuesday morning after the usual early morning rush. Spokesman Mike West said no problems had been reported at the county's 395 polling places and absentee and early voting numbers were at expected levels. But West says a warm, sunny day could help boost turnout at the polls.

Thirty percent of registered voters in the county, which includes Cleveland, voted in the November 2013 general election.

Poll workers at a church on the east side of Columbus in Franklin County said they had a line out the door when polls opened there. But workers say it had thinned out by midmorning.

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8:30 a.m.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted (HYOO'-sted) says more than 383,000 of the nearly 484,000 absentee ballots requested in this year's general election have been cast as voters head to the polls.

Husted said an informal survey of Ohio's 88 county boards of election as of Tuesday morning showed the majority of the absentee ballots cast were returned by mail and the rest in person.

Husted said there was still time to drop off absentee ballots. Voted ballots can be delivered in person to boards of elections through the close of the polls Tuesday. They may not be returned at polling locations.

Polls close at 7:30 p.m.

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7:40 a.m.

A small but steady stream of voters cast their ballots at an elementary school in the northern Cincinnati suburb of West Chester in the first hour after polls opened Tuesday in Ohio in the state's general election.

An Ohio mother from West Chester said she voted no on Issue 3. That ballot question would legalize marijuana for both recreational and medical use. Forty-year-old Beth Zielenski said she thought a lot of things need to be worked out first on regulation. Zielenski says the possibility of legalization "does worry me."

Forty-seven-year-old Timothy Shearer said he voted yes on Issue 3 and doesn't think it would cause more problems. Shearer described himself as a "military guy" who has never used marijuana. But he says he thinks people should have the right to choose.

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6:45 a.m.

Polls have opened in Ohio as voters decide on ballot issues including one that would legalize marijuana for both recreational and medical use and one involving a legislative redistricting overhaul.

Election sites opened their doors at 6:30 a.m. Tuesday. Polls remain open until 7:30 p.m.

Turnout is expected to be low as early presidential politicking has largely overshadowed 2015 campaigns.

The ballot question on marijuana would allow Ohio to become the first state to legalize it for both recreational and medical use in a single stroke. But opponents are hoping a separate measure aimed at nullifying the idea will succeed.

The redistricting measure would establish a new system for drawing state legislative districts in the battleground state.

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2:10 a.m.

A ballot question would allow Ohio to become the first state to legalize marijuana for both recreational and medical use in a single stroke. But opponents are placing their hopes in a separate measure aimed at nullifying the idea.

A redistricting overhaul rounds out a trio of statewide ballot issues before voters Tuesday. Turnout is expected to be low as early presidential politicking has largely overshadowed 2015 campaigns.

Issue 1, the redistricting measure, would establish a new system for drawing state legislative districts in the battleground state. It's intended to reduce partisan gerrymandering by giving the minority party more power in making 10-year maps.

Issue 2 bans constitutional monopolies and specifically targets 10 exclusive marijuana growing sites created by Issue 3, the pot-legalization amendment.

Copyright The Associated Press

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