The Latest: Italy students return; teachers need green pass

Students wearing face masks arrive at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Caption
Students wearing face masks arrive at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Credit: Andrew Medichini

Credit: Andrew Medichini

Some 4 million students in Italy have returned to the classroom after the summer break, with the Italian government determined to avoid any replay of remote learning

ROME — Some 4 million students in Italy have returned to the classroom after summer break, with the Italian government determined to avoid any replay of remote learning. Schools in 10 of the nation’s 20 regions began the academic year on Monday.

Students in the Alpine Alto Adige region started classes last week, and other regions, including Campania in the Naples area, begin the school year later this week.

Italian students in the last 1 1/2 years have seen relatively little in-classroom time. Starting this month, all teachers and administrative staff must have a Green Pass. That means they received at least one vaccine dose, have recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative for the virus in the previous 48 hours.

Education Minister Patrizio Bianchi says school reopening went smoothly on Monday, with 93% of teachers presenting Green Passes, and some others provided certification that they cannot be vaccinated for health reasons.

One critical area is transport. Many regions and cities have warned there aren’t enough buses, including local public transport, to avoid crowding during the trips to and from school.

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MORE ON THE PANDEMIC:

— School starts for 1 million New York City kids amid new vaccine rules

— Northern Idaho's anti-government streak hampers COVID fight

— West Virginia sets 2 daily records for positive virus cases

— UK ditches plans for vaccine passports at crowded venues

— See AP coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic.

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

LONDON — Britain’s chief medical officers say children aged 12 to 15 should be vaccinated against coronavirus, despite a ruling by the government’s vaccine advisors that the step would have only marginal health benefits.

England Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty and his counterparts in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, said Monday that the children should be given a single dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. They have yet to decide on a second dose.

The government has said it will follow the medical officers’ recommendations. Expanded vaccinations are expected to be part of a “tool kit” for dealing with the coronavirus in the fall and winter that Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to announce on Tuesday.

Earlier this month Britain’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization said the vaccine should be given to 12- to 15-year-olds with underlying health conditions. But it did not back a rollout to healthy children in that age group, saying the balance of benefit and risk was unclear.

However, it said there might be wider societal factors to consider, such as on education or children acting as sources of transmission.

Countries including the United States, Canada, France and Italy already offer coronavirus vaccines to people aged 12 and up

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ROME — The pregnant mayor of Turin, Italy, has posted an image from a sonogram of her unborn son urging other expectant women to follow her example and get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Mayor Chiara Appendino in Twitter and Facebook posts wrote: “He’s Andrea, and when he will be born, he’ll already have antibodies for COVID-19.’’

The mayor added that she received the vaccine in her sixth month of pregnancy, followed by the second dose. “Two doses, no symptom after the first, a half-day of tiredness after the second. Today we’re in the eighth month and we’re doing fine.”

The mayor said she made the posts after an unvaccinated pregnant woman in the Naples area died of COVID-19 last week, shortly after her baby was safely delivered prematurely by cesarean section.

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LISBON, Portugal — Wearing face masks outdoors to help prevent COVID-19 infection is no longer mandatory in Portugal, though it is still recommended when social distancing is not possible.

The rule on outdoor mask-wearing came into force last October and ended on Monday. Health authorities recommend that people always carry a mask with them, just in case.

The easing of the rule comes as Portugal’s 14-day cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people has dropped to 240. At the end of January, it was 1,668.

Almost 80% of the Portuguese population is fully vaccinated.

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BERLIN — Health workers are visiting kebab stalls, hockey games and hardware stores across Germany in a push to reach people who have yet to get a coronavirus shot as the country’s vaccination sputters.

It is part of a special week-long vaccination drive during which people will be offered the shots without appointments at easily accessible sites listed on a national website and promoted on social media with the hashtag “Hier wird geimpft,” meaning “Vaccinations offered here.”

“It’s never been easier to get a vaccine,” Chancellor Angela Merkel said in her weekend video address.

Germany wants 75% of the population to be immunized against the coronavirus, but so far only 62.2% of the population has received all the necessary shots.

Health Minister Jens Spahn on Monday defended growing pressure on unvaccinated people, including an end to free testing next month and — in some German states — no more sick pay for people in quarantine.

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PHOENIX -- A judge is set to hear arguments in a case seeking to overturn several new Arizona laws that restrict the power of local governments and school districts to impose COVID-19 restrictions such as mask mandates.

The coalition of educators, parents and children’s advocacy groups argue that the provisions were unconstitutionally tucked into unrelated budget bills.

The attorney representing Attorney General Mark Brnovich says how the Legislature writes measures and chooses the content are questions for lawmakers, not for the courts.

The laws would prohibit public school districts from imposing mask requirements, bar universities from requiring vaccinations for students and forbid communities from establishing so-called vaccine passports. A judge is hearing arguments Monday.

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WELLINGTON, New Zealand — New Zealand’s largest city, Auckland, will remain in the strictest type of lockdown until Sept. 21 after the government on Monday reported 33 new COVID-19 infections.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said lockdown restrictions were working to eliminate the outbreak of the highly transmissible delta variant.

“We don’t want to risk the sacrifices everyone has made and all the hard work you’ve put in by moving to Alert Level 3 too quickly,” Ardern said, referring to a relaxation of Auckland’s Alert Level 4 restrictions.

The rest of New Zealand will remain on Alert Level 2 until next week because of the risk of COVID-19 spreading from Auckland, she said.

“While there is an outbreak in Auckland that continues to produce cases, there is risk,” Ardern said.

The nation since last month has been battling an outbreak that came from Australia. The outbreak had grown to 955 cases by Monday with 21 infected patients in hospital and four in intensive care.

The government is pursuing an unusual strategy of trying to eliminate the virus entirely.

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BEIJING — A southeastern Chinese province has reported 22 more COVID-19 cases, bringing the total to 43 in a fresh outbreak driven by the highly transmissible delta variant.

Health authorities said Monday that 15 cases were confirmed in Putian city in the latest 24-hour period. Another six were found in Quanzhou city, and one more in Xiamen, suggesting the virus may be moving south from Putian.

All the infections are in Fujian province, which is across from Taiwan on China’s east coast.

Schools have been closed in Putian and anyone leaving the city must have proof of a negative COVID-19 test in the previous 48 hours. The city suspended bus and train service on Saturday and has closed cinemas, bars and other facilities.

China has largely stopped the spread of COVID-19 but has sporadic outbreaks. One outbreak driven by the delta variant spread to multiple provinces in July and August, raising concern about new and more contagious variants.

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CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia set two daily records in the past week for positive coronavirus cases as the pandemic continues to ravage the state.

Thursday’s total of confirmed cases was a record 1,738, only to be broken by Saturday’s total of 1,821, according to state health data. The previous one-day high of more than 1,700 was set on Dec. 31.

The statewide total of 7,849 positive cases for the six days ending Saturday has already passed the seven-day total for the previous week, which had been the second-highest during the pandemic. Sunday’s figures will be released on Monday.

The highest for one week was nearly 8,200 cases in early January, a time when virus vaccines were being offered only for people ages 65 and older.

The amount of weekly virus deaths statewide has gone up steadily since early August, when six deaths were reported for the week of Aug. 9. There have been 83 deaths in the past week and 3,207 overall.

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LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts says he plans to join other Republican governors in challenging President Joe Biden’s sweeping new vaccine requirement in court.

Ricketts said on “Fox News Sunday” that Nebraska’s attorney general has been consulting with other attorneys general who believe the federal government is overstepping its authority by mandating that all employers with more than 100 workers require them to be vaccinated or test for the virus weekly, affecting about 80 million Americans. The roughly 17 million workers at health facilities that receive federal Medicare or Medicaid also will have to be fully vaccinated.

“This is really going to create huge problems for all small businesses and for our American workers. and again, you shouldn’t have to make the choice of keeping your job or getting a jab in the arm,” Ricketts said.

In Nebraska, Ricketts has encouraged people to get vaccinated and wear masks but he has resisted mandates to do either.

The seven-day rolling average of daily new cases in Nebraska has risen over the past two weeks from 715.14 new cases per day on Aug. 27 to 822.86 new cases per day on Friday as the highly contagious delta variant of the virus spreads.

Ricketts said he is focused on making sure hospitals have enough capacity to handle the surge in COVID-19 cases.

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson says federal vaccination mandates announced by President Joe Biden last week hurt efforts to overcome the public’s resistance to taking the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Republican governor has been notable in working to persuade reluctant Arkansas residents to be vaccinated against the coronavirus. But in an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday, Hutchinson said a comprehensive federal vaccination mandate “hardens the resistance.”

The expansive rules mandate that all employers with more than 100 workers require them to be vaccinated or test for the virus weekly, affecting about 80 million Americans. And the roughly 17 million workers at health facilities that receive federal Medicare or Medicaid funding also will have to be fully vaccinated.

Hutchinson said federal requirements are “counterproductive,” interfering with state vaccination efforts instead of supporting them.

“We talked about the fact that we’ve historically had vaccination requirements in schools,” he said. “But those have always come at the state level, never at the national level.”

“And so this is an unprecedented assumption of federal mandate authority that really disrupts and divides the country. It divides our partnership between the federal government and the states. And it increases the division in terms of vaccination, when we should all be together trying to increase the vaccination uptake,” he added.

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LONDON — Britain’s health secretary said Sunday that authorities have decided not to require vaccine passports for entry into nightclubs and other crowded events in England, reversing course amid opposition from some of the Conservative government’s supporters in Parliament.

Sajid Javid said the government has shelved the idea of vaccine passports for now but could reconsider the decision if COVID-19 cases rise exponentially once again.

“We’ve looked at it properly and whilst we should keep it in reserve as a potential option, I’m pleased to say that we will not be going ahead with plans for vaccine passports,’’ Javid told the BBC.

The U-turn came just days after the government’s vaccines minister and the culture secretary suggested that vaccine passports would still be necessary, despite growing opposition from lawmakers. Such passports are required in other European countries, like France.

In particular, members of the governing Conservative Party have objected to such passports as an unacceptable burden on businesses and an infringement on residents’ human rights.

Students wearing face masks arrive at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Caption
Students wearing face masks arrive at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Credit: Andrew Medichini

Credit: Andrew Medichini

A teacher, left, has her so-called "Green Pass" checked by a school worker as she arrives at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Caption
A teacher, left, has her so-called "Green Pass" checked by a school worker as she arrives at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Credit: Andrew Medichini

Credit: Andrew Medichini

A teacher and students wear face masks during a lesson, at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Caption
A teacher and students wear face masks during a lesson, at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Credit: Andrew Medichini

Credit: Andrew Medichini

A teacher, left, has her so-called "Green Pass" checked by a school worker as she arrives at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Caption
A teacher, left, has her so-called "Green Pass" checked by a school worker as she arrives at the "Isacco Newton" high school, in Rome, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. After most of the last year spent with high schools in remote learning or lock-down, students are going back in classrooms, with all school workers having to present a so-called "Green Pass" that proves they has received at least one vaccine dose in the last nine months, recovered from COVID-19 in the last six months or tested negative in the previous 48 hours, to access the institutes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Credit: Andrew Medichini

Credit: Andrew Medichini

A health worker takes a nasal swab sample of a woman to test for COVID-19 in Jammu, India, Monday, Sept.13, 2021. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
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A health worker takes a nasal swab sample of a woman to test for COVID-19 in Jammu, India, Monday, Sept.13, 2021. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Credit: Channi Anand

Credit: Channi Anand

A health worker carries used bottles of China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
Caption
A health worker carries used bottles of China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Credit: Aaron Favila

Credit: Aaron Favila

Students attend a class at the Narinda Government High School as schools reopen after being closed for nearly 18 months due to the coronavirus pandemic in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sunday, Sept.12, 2021. (AP Photo/Mahmud Hossain Opu)
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Students attend a class at the Narinda Government High School as schools reopen after being closed for nearly 18 months due to the coronavirus pandemic in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sunday, Sept.12, 2021. (AP Photo/Mahmud Hossain Opu)

Credit: Mahmud Hossain Opu

Credit: Mahmud Hossain Opu

FILE - In this Feb. 3 2021 file photo, the French vaccine startup Valneva headquarters is pictured in Saint-Herblain, western France. A French pharmaceutical startup announced Monday, Sept. 13, 2021 that the British government has abruptly terminated an agreement for it to supply tens of millions of COVID-19 vaccines. Britain alleged that Valneva was in breach of its obligations under the supply agreement, which the company "strenuously" denied. There was no immediate comment from the British side.(AP Photo/David Vincent, File)
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FILE - In this Feb. 3 2021 file photo, the French vaccine startup Valneva headquarters is pictured in Saint-Herblain, western France. A French pharmaceutical startup announced Monday, Sept. 13, 2021 that the British government has abruptly terminated an agreement for it to supply tens of millions of COVID-19 vaccines. Britain alleged that Valneva was in breach of its obligations under the supply agreement, which the company "strenuously" denied. There was no immediate comment from the British side.(AP Photo/David Vincent, File)

Credit: David Vincent

Credit: David Vincent

A man is inoculated with China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
Caption
A man is inoculated with China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Credit: Aaron Favila

Credit: Aaron Favila

Residents wait for their turn at a vaccination center in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
Caption
Residents wait for their turn at a vaccination center in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Credit: Aaron Favila

Credit: Aaron Favila

Mariel Albia is inoculated with China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
Caption
Mariel Albia is inoculated with China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Quezon city, Philippines on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The government continues to urge Filipinos to get vaccinated as COVID-19 cases keep rising in the country. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Credit: Aaron Favila

Credit: Aaron Favila

Children wearing face masks enter a school at the end of festivities marking the beginning of the school year, in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
Children wearing face masks enter a school at the end of festivities marking the beginning of the school year, in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

A girl wearing a face mask reacts during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise.  (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
A girl wearing a face mask reacts during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Children wearing face masks hold flowers during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
Children wearing face masks hold flowers during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

A woman wearing a face mask holds a little girl during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise.  (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
A woman wearing a face mask holds a little girl during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

A boy wearing a face mask holds flowers during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
A boy wearing a face mask holds flowers during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Children wearing face masks react during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise.  (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
Children wearing face masks react during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

A girl wearing a face mask reacts during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
A girl wearing a face mask reacts during festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Children take part in festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
Caption
Children take part in festivities marking the beginning of the school year at a school in Bucharest, Romania, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Children returned to classrooms in Romania, a country with one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the European Union, as the daily infection numbers continue to rise. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

Credit: Andreea Alexandru

Credit: Andreea Alexandru