When two ransomware attacks hit the city of Riverside in April and May, it wasn’t the first time the city’s public safety servers lost data because of a malicious virus, this newspaper found in a review of city records. FILE

Pete Williams beats 3 for Riverside mayor; road levy fails

Pete Williams won the race for Riverside mayor, according to unofficial results.

With all 14 precincts reporting, Williams had 52% of the final vote.

Williams was at home helping his three sons finish their homework when results rolled in.

“This shows that the city and its residents want a new direction,” Williams said. “This is vindicating for me, but the work begins now.”

LIVE ELECTION RESULTS HERE

According to unofficial results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections, Williams got more votes than all three of his opponents combined.

Mike Denning, Sara Lommatzsch and Shirley Reynolds also ran for mayor of Riverside.

“From the time I pulled petitions to run in July, the overwhelming thing I heard was that people wanted change,” Williams said. “I want to move Riverside forward.”

The Riverside road improvement levy was defeated.

With all precincts reporting, about 57% of voters said “no” to the 8-mill levy. This same levy was also defeated in 2018.

UPDATE at 9:35 p.m.:

Pete Williams has won the race for Riverside mayor, according to unofficial results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections.

With 14 of 14 precincts reporting, Williams had about 52% of the vote.

Williams was at home helping his three sons finish their homework when results rolled in.

“From the time I pulled petitions to run in July, the overwhelming thing I heard was that people wanted change,” Williams said. “I want to move Riverside forward.”

According to unofficial results, Williams got more votes than the other three candidates combined.

UPDATE at 9:10 p.m.:

With 12 of 14 precincts reporting, Pete Williams is winning the race for Riverside mayor.

Williams is leading the race with about half of the vote, according to unofficial results.

UPDATE at 8:15 p.m.:

Pete Williams is in the lead in the Riverside mayor’s race, according to early unofficial results.

Williams has about 39% of the vote, Mike Denning has about 20%, Sara Lommatzsch has about 19% and Shirley Reynolds has 15%. Only the absentee ballots had been counted so far.

All but one of the candidates running, Williams, has served or is serving on Riverside City Council.

Denning currently sits on council and has been on council for 10 years. Lommatzsch is also on city council. Shirley Reynolds does not currently serve on council, but previously served for 12 years. Williams works for Carroll High School as director of advancement.

Riverside voters were about about evenly split on the 8-mill road levy in early results.

This is the same 8-mill road improvement levy Riverside residents rejected last year.

VOTERS GUIDE: GET THE CANDIDATES’ ANSWERS TO MORE QUESTIONS HERE

ORIGINAL STORY:

Voters in Riverside will decide on a new mayor and a street levy in Tuesday’s election.

With Riverside Mayor Bill Flaute retiring, four people will vie for the position in Tuesday’s election.

Mike Denning, Sara Lommatzsch, Shirley Reynolds and Pete Williams are all running for mayor of Riverside.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 5.

All but one of the candidates, Williams, has served or is serving on Riverside City Council. Denning currently sits on council and has been on council for 10 years. Lommatzsch is also on city council. Shirley Reynolds does not currently serve on council, but previously served for 12 years. Williams works for Carroll High School as director of advancement.

The city of Riverside is also taking a second crack at a levy Tuesday, asking voters to approve the same 8-mill road improvement levy they rejected last year by just over a percentage point. It’s the highest millage of any new levy on the ballot, but city officials say with 70% of roads in fair or poor condition, it still wouldn’t raise as much as their road study said is needed.

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