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Close margin on Beavercreek Twp. additional levy

The vote on a 0.9-mill continuing levy that will be used to maintain and possibly expand police services in the Beavercreek Township was too close to call, according to Greene County Board of Elections preliminary unofficial results late Tuesday.

Beavercreek Twp. Trustee Carol Graff said she hoped the levy would be approved by a wide margin.

“I was hopeful that because of the service that has been provided over the last number of years, with the amount of millage we have been operating on, that people would be pleased and they would support the increase to keep the services that we presently have and perhaps increase it over the future years,” she said.

The new additional levy, which would only impact residents in unincorporated areas of the township, would cost homeowners $31.50 per $100,000 appraised estimated value, according to the Greene County Auditor’s Office, and annually generate an estimated $238,000.

The levy money would be used to fund the township’s contract with the county sheriff’s office for law enforcement services. Four deputies are assigned to the township.

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Three continuing levies of 1 mill or less are currently being used to fund police services.

This latest levy on the ballot marks the first time the township has asked voters to approve a police levy in almost four decades. The last time was 38 years ago in 1978, according to the township.

Oakwood levy

A 2.72-mill public services levy renewal for the city of Oakwood was winning big late Tuesday, with 72 percent of voters approving the measure with just two precincts yet to report, according to the Montgomery County Board of Elections.

The levy is expected to annually generate about $460,000 a year for police, fire and roadway maintenance, according to the city.

The 2.72-mill levy was first approved by voters in 1991 and approved every five years since that date.

The levy renewal will cost property owners about $48 a year per $100,000 of appraised estimated value.

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