Fairborn Assistant City Manager Pete Bales has left his post with the city. FILE

Fairborn to pay assistant city manager $43,000 in separation deal

Bales and Rob Anderson, Fairborn city manager, agreed to separate Bales’ employment on July 1, according to Meghan Howard, communications manager for the city manager’s office.

Bales agreed to not file a lawsuit against the city, according to the separation agreement obtained by the Dayton Daily News through a public records request.

“(Bales) left in good standing with the city,” Howard said. “This was a better move for his career. He wanted to be a city manager, and they decided he had a better opportunity to do that elsewhere.”

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The city of Fairborn agreed to pay Bales four months of his base pay through October 31, totaling $43,000.

The city also agreed to pay the employer portion of Bales’ health insurance premiums in the agreement, signed May 25.

The agreement states Bales had 21 days to consider the terms and was encouraged to seek an attorney, which the document acknowledges he did.

Anderson also wrote Bales a three-paragraph letter of recommendation to use in the future.

Bales’ position will not be filled, Howard said. Most of his duties have been dispersed throughout other departments, as he was mostly working on special projects, Howard said.

Bales received all positive performance evaluations in his more than 17 years with the city, also according to his personnel file. His most recent personnel action form showed Bales was making $122,512 annually.

He had been assistant city manager since 2015, served briefly as interim city manager and sought the job of city manager in 2017 when Anderson was hired. Bales started working for the city as the Parks and Recreation superintendent in 2002, according to his personnel file.

MORE: Fairborn pays fire chief $20K in separation agreement

Anderson fired Fairborn Fire Chief Mike Riley in February.

Riley was fired Feb. 22 and was paid $20,000 in a separation agreement with the city. Anderson told the Dayton Daily News at the time that the city’s fire department needed to “move forward under different leadership.”

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