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Fairborn traffic changes near Wright-Patt to become permanent

Traffic pattern changes impacting Wright-Patterson Air Force Base commuters and Fairborn residents will become permanent under a plan proposed by the city engineer, according to city documents.

The plan is part of the city’s ongoing effort to curb traffic on Greene Street, Ohio Street and South Street where they intersect with Broad Street, near WPAFB Gate 1A.

MORE: Fairborn implementing changes on streets near WPAFB

In January, the city implemented temporary “right-out only” traffic control on the three neighborhood streets onto Broad Street.

“The traffic control change has been well received by the residents of Greene, Ohio, and South and the volume of traffic on these streets has decreased significantly,” reads a memo from the engineer to city manager. “The decision has been made to make the change permanent with new curbs, extended medians and new storm drainage facilities.”

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The new infrastructure is scheduled for inclusion in the 2018 capital improvement plan. Temporary barricades will remain in place until then.

MORE: Fairborn to block off side streets near Wright-Patt gate

Additionally, the Fairborn Police Department has requested “No Right Turn” signs be erected on northbound Broad Street at the three streets to aid with enforcement efforts, according to the email.

Council will consider legislation Monday to make the turn prohibition enforceable.

Traffic problems on the three streets grew since the 2012 re-route of Ohio 444 off WPAFB Area A onto Kauffman Avenue, South Central Avenue, West Dayton Drive and Broad Street, as base commuters used the neighborhood roads to access Gate 1A.

At its peak in 2015, Ohio Street saw an average of 2,000 vehicles per day — far more than the anticipated 800-900 daily vehicles a street of that size should handle, city officials said.

MORE: Public meeting discussed Fairborn traffic issues

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