This near-hidden Dayton Civil War marker quietly honors troops while controversy swirls elsewhere

A smaller monument commemorating Union soldiers is tucked away at the southwest corner of Stewart and Main Streets. LISA POWELL
A smaller monument commemorating Union soldiers is tucked away at the southwest corner of Stewart and Main Streets. LISA POWELL

Controversy over Confederate statues has dominated news coverage in recent days.

Many are familiar with two significant monuments honoring Union soldiers in Dayton.

Pvt. George Washington Fair was the model for the Union Soldiers’ Monument that has stood over Main Street since 1884, and the 30-foot-tall Dayton Soldier’s Monument is the centerpiece of the Dayton National Cemetery on W. Third Street.

A smaller monument commemorating Union soldiers is tucked away at the southwest corner of Stewart and Main Streets. LISA POWELL
A smaller monument commemorating Union soldiers is tucked away at the southwest corner of Stewart and Main Streets. LISA POWELL

Another smaller monument is tucked away at the southwest corner of Stewart and Main Streets.

A plaque secured to a granite bolder commemorates the 93rd Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry and marks a location near where 968 men encamped before they “mustered into service of the United States August 20th 1862.”

The regiment left for the front three days later. The plaque, which was erected by survivors in 1915, also lists the numerous battles the regiment took part in.

» READ MORE: How Dayton’s giant Main Street monument faced twists and turns to land there

» READ MORE: How Dayton paid respect to America’s Civil War veterans

In Other News