These eight people were recently named to top positions in Montgomery County’s government. Top row, left to right: Joyce Carter, director of human resources; Kelly Geers, director of strategic planning; Bob Gruhl, interim director of the Animal Resource Center; and Marvene Mitchell, director of workforce development. Bottom row, left to right: Michelle Niedermier, director of Job & Family Services; Tyler Small, currently director of purchasing and central services, will become an assistant county administrator for administrative services; Chris Williams, assistant county administrator for business services; and Brianna Wooten, director of communications.

Who got new top Montgomery County government jobs?

Montgomery County has made several departmental and personnel changes to better align resources as the county begins a new strategic planning cycle, said county Administrator Michael Colbert, who took over in September after the retirement Joe Tuss.

“We’ve made significant progress on our reorganization efforts, as well as other large initiatives,” he said.

MORE: New Montgomery County administrator named

The county keeps a structure of three main service and responsibility areas, but some functions have shifted and one has had a name change. By the end of January, Colbert will be working with two new assistant administrators and six directors all newly installed in the past few months.

The county announced last week that Amy Wiedeman, a 35-year county employee and assistant county administrator for administrative services will retire. Wiedeman will be succeeded by Tyler Small, currently director of purchasing and central services. Administrative services oversees human resources, facilities and emergency management, as well as purchasing, central services and risk management.

Tom Kelley remains assistant county administrator over human services.

Chris Williams, formerly director of the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office and Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab, was recently named assistant county administrator for business services.

The former development services’ name was changed to business services to reflect expanded roles under the reorganization, which consolidated information technology within the department, according to the county. Responsibility for the county’s embattled Animal Resource Center was also moved to business services from administrative services. The former shelter director was fired and an interim director named after an outside November assessment of the shelter turned up a number of operational flaws.

MORE: County looks ahead after embattled animal shelter director’s job ends

Colbert said some operations were shifted to align resources as the county begins a new strategic planning cycle.

Also, since Colbert became administrator, the county selected Trotwood as the site for a new Western Division of the County Municipal Court and successfully negotiated a three-year contract with county workers represented by the American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees (AFSCME) that will provide long-term stability for operations and employees, he said.

MORE: Trotwood tapped for new municipal court facility

“We have more work to do, but I’m confident we will get it done with the great people we have on our side,” he said.

Others taking new director roles in the past six months include:

- Joyce Carter, director of human resources

- Kelly Geers, director of strategic planning

- Bob Gruhl, interim director of the Animal Resource Center

- Marvene Mitchell, director of workforce development

- Michelle Niedermier, director of Job & Family Services

- Brianna Wooten, director of communications

Ongoing county directors include:

- Erik Collins, director of community and economic development

- Jeff Jordan, director of Emergency Management

- Phil Miller, director of facilities and management

- John Parks, director Office of Management and Budget

- Geraldine Pegues, director of human services planning and development

- Dr. Michelle Pierce-Mobley, director of the Stillwater Center

- Jon Rike, director of information technologies

- Pat Turnbull, director of environmental services

Montgomery County’s total 2019 adopted budget is $870.9 million with 4,205 authorized positions.

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