What a hoot: Baby owls born on window ledge stare down office worker

A photo of a burrowing owl. Owls can rotate their necks 270 degrees and their eyes are not true eyeballs. They’re immobile which allows for better prey location.
Caption
A photo of a burrowing owl. Owls can rotate their necks 270 degrees and their eyes are not true eyeballs. They’re immobile which allows for better prey location.

Credit: Chris Jackson

Credit: Chris Jackson

Baby owls born on the ledge of a window at a University of California office building are causing quite a hoot among workers in the building.

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The owlets are constantly staring into the window of a colleague of UCLA professor Michael Lens, according to Lens.

He posted a photo on Twitter of the unusual nesting owls.

There are more than 200 species of the bird throughout the world, according to the National Audubon Society.

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Here are some interesting facts about the bird of prey: They can rotate their necks 270 degrees and their eyes are not true eyeballs. They're completely immobile, which allows for binocular vision and boosts depth of perception to help them better focus on prey, according to the NAS.