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Ohioans against increased tariffs on Canada, Mexico; split on China, poll says

A new survey shows Ohio voters oppose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union while they are equally divided on tariffs on Chinese goods if those duties raise the cost of consumer goods.

The poll, released Thursday by Quinnipiac University, suggest Ohio voters are more wary of tariffs and protectionist policies by the federal government than many political analysts believe.

By a difference of 45 percent to 35 percent, Ohio voters oppose the new 25 percent tariff on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminum imposed last month by President Donald Trump.

RELATED: How would Trump tariffs work?

That opposition increases to 57 percent if the steel and aluminum tariffs lead to higher prices. Economists have argued that tariffs on steel and aluminum will raise the price of a broad array of consumer products from cars, trucks, and washing machines.

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“Despite Ohio’s reputation as a blue-collar bastion, Buckeye state voters overall are not supportive of increasing tariffs on steel and aluminum imported into the United States from foreign lands,” said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac poll.

RELATED: What is a tarrif and why should you be worried about it

The polls shows 55 percent of Ohio voters favor tariffs on Chinese imports, but when asked if they would back those tariffs “raised the costs of goods that you buy,” support plummets to 46 percent while 46 percent would oppose the tariffs.

The poll of 1,082 Ohio voters was conducted by landline telephones and cell phones from June 7 through Tuesday. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.7 percent.

The poll also showed that 76 percent of Ohio voters favor allowing undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children to remain while 51 percent of voters want to retain the 2010 health law known as Obamacare.

Those numbers suggest that Republican officeholders are at odds with voters in Ohio. Republicans have been cool to overhauling immigration laws and a sizable majority oppose Obamacare.

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