Dayton Delivers app will get upgrades after complaints

Dayton city commissioners Matt Joseph, Chris Shaw and Jeff Mims Jr. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

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Dayton city commissioners Matt Joseph, Chris Shaw and Jeff Mims Jr. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

Dayton Delivers, the city’s customer service app, last year lost a feature that users say prevented them from reporting some problems or making service requests because they did not have an address recognized by the city’s system.

But city officials say the app and website will be upgraded in mid-April, and users once again should be able to use a map to show where service is needed.

“The Dayton Delivers app is very important,” Dayton City Commissioner Matt Joseph said. “We all know it has not worked well for a little while now.”

The city launched the Dayton Delivers app in 2014 to provide a convenient way to report nonemergency problems like illegal dumping, vacant lot issues, graffiti, dead animals, potholes and other issues.

The app also can be used to request bulk waste pickup, trash removal, tree removal and other needs.

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A sanitation worker picks up recycling in Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

A sanitation worker picks up recycling in Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

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A sanitation worker picks up recycling in Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The city converted to the new Dayton Delivers 2.0 app in October, and since then it has received more than 3,260 service requests through the application and the website.

City officials say the Dayton Delivers 2.0 app is working and accepting requests for service, and people can download the app on their phones or mobile devices from the Apple or Google play stores.

But some people have complained on social media, including Nextdoor.com, that they have had problems reporting illegal dumping and other issues through the newer app/website.

Multiple residents said they could not report issues on vacant lots, public land and other locations like alleys because they did not have an address that was recognized by the city’s system.

They said the old Dayton Delivers app allowed them to place a marker on a map to show where to send city crews.

If people come across trash in an alley or an intersection where the the address is unclear, they can provide a description of the location in the location details section, at least for certain requests, said Fred Stovall, Dayton’s public work director.

Stovall, however, said some types of requests like bulk pickup and housing issues require users to provide an address.

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Fred Stovall, Director of Public Works at City of Dayton, looks over the salt in storage at the city’s facility. .JIM WITMER / STAFF

Credit: Jim Witmer

Fred Stovall, Director of Public Works at City of Dayton, looks over the salt in storage at the city’s facility. .JIM WITMER / STAFF

Credit: Jim Witmer

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Fred Stovall, Director of Public Works at City of Dayton, looks over the salt in storage at the city’s facility. .JIM WITMER / STAFF

Credit: Jim Witmer

Credit: Jim Witmer

Stovall said software that supports the app will be upgraded next month and will include map-based location data entry, which should resolve most people’s concerns.

Residents also can contact the customer call center at 937-333-4800 to report issues, he said.

City officials and elected leaders said the app needs to be fixed because it helps resolve quality-of-life issues.

There were “a few bugs ... and address incongruities,” said Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein. “We we are working through some of those enhancements and customizations and have a projected timeline of April to have that back up and running appropriately.”

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