Ohio drivers struggle to pay parking tickets

Almost one-third of drivers in the Buckeye State said they would struggle to afford to pay a parking ticket. Metro Creative Connection photo
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Almost one-third of drivers in the Buckeye State said they would struggle to afford to pay a parking ticket. Metro Creative Connection photo

The parking battleground: One-third of Ohio drivers say they would struggle to afford to pay a parking ticket, reveals a survey.

One in 10 drivers in Ohio determined to contest parking tickets.

And one in 10 would park in a disabled space if the motorist thought he or she could get away with it.

Walking back to your car and seeing a ticket on the windscreen is one of life’s biggest curses – and it’s especially annoying if you believe you’ve been unfairly hit. Prices can range from about $10 to $20 in smaller cities, to more than $50 in larger metro areas.

So what do the majority of us do when we’re faced with a ticket? Do we dispute it? Or do we pay the fine?

Auto advice website CarBibles.com conducted a survey of 3,500 drivers to discover how we react to parking tickets and whether we can afford to pay them.

Recent headlines have screamed that the cost of living is increasing at its fastest rate for 10 years, so it is no surprise that almost one-third of drivers in the Buckeye State said they would struggle to afford to pay a parking ticket.

Interestingly, 1 in 10 Ohioans said they have appealed parking tickets. Whether they feel they have been unjustly penalized, or are confident they can exploit a loophole in the system, it appears many Ohioans are game for a fight with the local authorities.

Given that one in 10 drivers have contested parking tickets, it’s not surprising that the study revealed that 17 percent actually have argued with the parking enforcer when issuing the ticket.

Fun fact: the first-ever meter was installed in Oklahoma on July 16, 1935, and ran at a rate of 5 cents per hour. It’s fair to say it’s increased in price slightly since then.

A recent study revealed that we spend 17 hours per year on average just looking for a parking bay – but just how low would we go to get the ideal space?

Parking in a disabled space when you don’t have a disability is considered an extremely selfish act, but unfortunately a lot of drivers do it – with the survey revealing that 1 in 10 admit they would park in a disabled parking space if they thought they could get away with it.

“Our survey shows that one-third of drivers would struggle to afford a parking ticket, emphasizing how important it is not to park somewhere you are not authorized to park. That said, you don’t always have to take a parking violation lying down. If you’re adamant you weren’t in the wrong, make sure to gather as much evidence as you can in your defense, and appeal to avoid paying up,” said Dan Collins, of CarBibles.com.

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