This 1911 Stoddard-Dayton, owned by Michael Howard of Michigan, will be one of 200 fascinating vehicles on display at the 2019 Concours’ d’Elegance at Carillon Park in Dayton on Sept. 15. Contributed photo

Show chairman, concours director say to put Sept. 15 on your calendar

For almost a quarter of a century two men and dozens of other volunteers have had a multifaceted mission: to share their love of all things automotive, highlight the Dayton community’s myriad accomplishments and help raise funds for Dayton History, Montgomery County’s official historical organization.

Skip Peterson has long been the show chairman and Mike Edgerton the concours director of the Dayton Concours d’Elegance at Carillon Park, now in its 13th year.

The concours, set for Sept. 15, will show up to 200 antique and classic automobiles and motorcycles and scooters and will be judged for awards in 24 classes. The public is invited to enjoy roaming the 65-acre park grounds to view the vehicles, plus visit the many intriguing and fully staffed exhibits. It’s a casual, family-friendly occasion.

Featured this year will be grand classic cars like Duesenberg, Rolls Royce, Packard, Cadillac, Bentley and more, plus the 50th anniversary of the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am will be celebrated. Show vehicles are coming from seven different states, Edgerton said.

Another part of the event is the Fisher Body Craftsman’s Guild reunion during which hand-built model cars will be shown in the Dicke Transportation Center. Guildsmen from across the country will display concept car models they built as teenagers in the ’50s and ’60s as entries in a General Motors-sponsored contest of that era.

Hagerty Insurance will once again sponsor kids’ judging.

“It’s an experience for 15 kids younger than 15 to be involved in the concours and to learn about collecting cars,” Peterson said. “A mentor will work with them to judge the Premier Class – all of the class winners from last year. That winner receives the Hagerty Kids Judging Award.

“It teaches the kids how judges look at cars and how to appreciate them,” he continued. “Plus, by judging the Premier Class, it gives the kids a wide range of cars. They’re going to see everything from a 1920 model to a 1989 car. They’ll see an evolution of vehicles, which gives them a broader base to work from.”

Peterson said he and his wife, Jennifer, have good reasons for supporting the event.

“We’re now in a location that embraces the history,” he said. “This event is so much more than just lining up cars in a field. At Carillon Historical Park, we have the history of Dayton and the technology and innovations our community is known for.

“The artifacts are here on display so you’re bringing everything together in one place,” Peterson said. “It’s not just looking at cars. It’s an event with so much to do during the timeframe that we’re open.”

Edgerton said he’s been a “car guy” his entire life and really enjoys meeting the people – the owners and caretakers – associated with the cars, plus fellow volunteers. He is excited the concours will bring the following, he said:

• “I’m happy we are going to be able to bring in a Stoddard Dayton. It will be another example for viewing, as Dayton History has its own Stoddard Dayton.”

• A class of “brass-era” cars – vehicles manufactured prior to 1915, before chrome was being used. Brass grilles, lights and radiators will shine. A 1914 Packard from America’s Packard Museum in downtown Dayton will stand in that class and will be joined by a 1910 Buick and 1911 Marmon.

• A hot rod and custom class will offer twice as many hot rods as in previous shows, joined by four “restomods” – cars with fully restored exteriors but packed with today’s conveniences, brakes, suspensions and technology.

• The Chandler-Cleveland Motor Club will be bringing at least one Cleveland from 1920; it will be joined by a Chandler coming from Illinois. “Most people don’t even know there was a car called the Cleveland,” Peterson noted.

• Classic Car Club of America is holding a series of events in Dayton during the concours weekend; a number of their vehicles, including an Auburn, a Pierce-Arrow and a Packard are entering the concours, Edgerton said.

Associated events

The weekend will kick off Sept. 14 with a special edition of Dayton Cars and Coffee. This morning gathering, which is free and open to any car and draws hundreds of vehicles, will take place in the parking lot of the park’s Carillon Brewing Co. from 8 to 11 a.m.

That evening will be a casual preview party from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. with a jazzy New Orleans theme; it is open to the public and will feature food by Brock Masterson’s Catering with a NOLA influence, paired with premium wine, craft beer, spirits and specialty bourbons. Tickets are $85 for Dayton History members and $95 for non-members. For tickets and more information, go online to www.daytonconcours.com or call 937-293-3841.

13TH ANNUAL DAYTON CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE AT CARILLON PARK, 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., grounds of Carillon Historical Park, 1000 Carillon Blvd., Dayton. Admission is $25 for adults, $20 if purchased in advance through Sept. 14, $10 for children ages 3-17, free to Dayton History members and children younger than 3. Free parking. Presented by AAA, with major support from WinSupply and TJH Collections. Featuring grand classic cars like Duesenberg, Rolls Royce, Packard, Cadillac, Bentley and more, plus 50th anniversary of the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am. Another part is the Fisher Body Craftsman’s Guild reunion during which hand-built model cars will be shown in the Dicke Transportation Center. A casual preview party with a jazzy New Orleans theme on Sept. 14 from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. is open to the public. Tickets are $85 for Dayton History members and $95 for non-members. All proceeds support Dayton History, Montgomery County’s official historical organization. For more information, go online to www.daytonconcours.com or call 937-293-3841.

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