About half of community college students would drop out due to money

A new report out this week shows that around 47 percent of community college students said they would drop out because of financial issues.
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A new report out this week shows that around 47 percent of community college students said they would drop out because of financial issues.

Nearly half of community college students say a lack of finances is an issue that could cause them to withdraw from school.

Around 47 percent of community college students told the Center for Community College Student Engagement that they may withdraw because of their finances, according to a report out from the group this week.

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While almost half of students may drop out because of money issues, 30 percent of students have not filed a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), according to the report.

Around 63 percent of community college students live paycheck to paycheck, according to the report. Around 54 percent of students told the TITLE that they also struggle to keep up with their bills.

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Below is some of the data from the report:

47 percent may drop out because of finances.

39 percent receive Pell Grants.

40 percent of students who receive Pell Grants also depend on student loans.

30 percent did not fill out a FAFSA.

27 percent said their college provided inadequate financial information.

51 percent felt they had too much student loan debt.

63 percent live paycheck to paycheck.

54 percent to some degree struggle to pay bills.

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