Ceremony marks command’s recent leadership change at Wright-Patt

Capt. Rees Lee (front left) is relieved by Capt. Matthew Hebert (front right) who assumed the role of commanding officer, Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton Aug. 6. Capt. Adam Armstrong, commander, Naval Medical Research Center (middle), was the immediate superior in command and Rear Adm. Paul Pearigen, commander, Navy Medicine West (back right) was the presiding officer of the ceremony. (U.S. Air Force photo/Michelle Gigante)
Caption
Capt. Rees Lee (front left) is relieved by Capt. Matthew Hebert (front right) who assumed the role of commanding officer, Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton Aug. 6. Capt. Adam Armstrong, commander, Naval Medical Research Center (middle), was the immediate superior in command and Rear Adm. Paul Pearigen, commander, Navy Medicine West (back right) was the presiding officer of the ceremony. (U.S. Air Force photo/Michelle Gigante)

Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton held a change of command ceremony where Capt. Rees L. Lee relinquished command to Capt. Matthew W. Hebert.at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Aug. 6.

Rear Adm. Paul Pearigen, commander, Navy Medicine West, addressed ceremony attendees and members of the official party as the presiding officer.

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“It is a distinct honor and privilege for me to be here today as we gather to mark this transfer of authority, responsibility and accountability from one accomplished naval officer to another,” said Pearigen.

As NAMRU-Dayton commanding officer, Lee supported the success of the two science directorates, the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory and the Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, in addition to the support staff.

“I really had no idea the tremendous challenges and successes that were in store. To say that this command tour has been rewarding would be a woeful understatement,” said Lee.

During Lee’s tenure, command continued to respond to the needs of the military by increasing the size of the scientific staff by more than 60 percent.

“When Naval Aviation needed to understand physiologic episodes affecting some of our fighter pilots, you responded, by developing 23 new initiatives, quadrupling the funding dedicated to this effort,” said Lee.

According to Lee, the success of NAMRU-Dayton is dependent on the mutual support of many, many collaborators.

“We have an abundance of support from across the state,” he said.

Lee will report as Naval Surface Force Atlantic Force surgeon for his next assignment.

Hebert, NAMRU-Dayton’s new commanding officer, is an aerospace physiologist and seasoned in Navy Medicine and the Naval Aviation Enterprise.

“I’d like to humbly thank the chain of command for the privilege and your trust to lead the women and men of the Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton. I cannot think of a finer group of professionals by reputation and by accomplishment than are employed here. You have my promise to do everything under my influence and to work tirelessly on the mission, foster camaraderie and to ensure that all professional challenges provided to this command exceed expectations,” said Hebert.

For more information visit www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmrc/Dayton and follow on Facebook @NavalMedicalResearchUnitDayton and Twitter @NAMRUDayton.