Young people in Springboro protest death of George Floyd

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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Crowd gathers in Springboro to protest death of George Floyd

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

About 50 young people gathered Tuesday afternoon in Springboro to mark the death of George Floyd, who died May 25 while in police custody in Minneapolis.

A video of an officer kneeling on Floyd’s neck triggered nationwide protests that have spread to Dayton and its surrounding communities in the past week.

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A crowd of mostly young people gathers in Springboro Tuesday afternoon, June 2, 2020, to protest the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. JIM NOELKER / STAFF

A crowd of mostly young people gathers in Springboro Tuesday afternoon, June 2, 2020, to protest the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. JIM NOELKER / STAFF

Combined ShapeCaption
A crowd of mostly young people gathers in Springboro Tuesday afternoon, June 2, 2020, to protest the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. JIM NOELKER / STAFF

The Springboro event organizers, Katherine Cismesia and Brooklynne Stange, both 16, are students from Springboro High School.

They organized the event because they wanted to see the community “come together in a safe way on this important issue,” Cismesia said.

>>PHOTOS of Springboro protest

>>Organizer says expect ‘plenty’ more protests in Dayton region

Protesters in Springboro were gathering in North Park, not far from Ohio 741 and Ohio 73. Many of the demonstrators were high-school age, but some were adults.

Kendra Cunningham said that as a black family living in predominantly white Springboro, it was important for her to know that other people in town recognize that this is a serious issue.

Cunningham was sitting with her friends, Derek and Sarah Scott, who are white.

“In a super white suburb, it’s nice to see people willing to step out of their comfort zone,” Derek Scott said.

Cunningham said living in Springboro, it is sometimes easy to pretend that racism doesn’t affect her and her family because they don’t see things like the killing of Floyd in places like Springboro.

“But it’s the little things that add up,” Cunningham said.

She said it was encouraging to see so many young people out on Tuesday.

One of those youths was Tony Thach.

“As a minority, we have to stand up for other minorities,” Thach said. “I would have been here if only five people showed up. I think this is really important.”

The 15-year-old Asian American said that he was surprised at the number of people who came to the protest, but happy to see everyone.

“People need to do whatever they can, sign every single petition and educate themselves and others on this issue,” Thach said.

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