6 local schools awarded funds for suicide prevention programs

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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Warning Signs of Suicide and Resources for Help

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Six local schools have been awarded $40,000 in mini-grants for suicide prevention programming.

• Fairfield City Schools ($7,000)

• Madison Local Schools ($6,000)

• Marshall High School ($6,000)

• Middletown City Schools ($7,000)

• Ross Local Schools ($7,000)

• Talawanda Local Schools ($7,000)

“Grant dollars will support our schools and our youth in raising public awareness about suicide,” said Beth Race, Executive Director of the Butler County Family and Children First Council, which announced the funds. “By sharing resources available to students like the local Butler County Crisis Hotline and working to challenge the stigma of mental health, we can help others in crisis, prevent suicides and save lives.”

According to the Ohio Violent Death Reporting System, suicide is the second-leading cause of death in youth and young adults ages 10-24 in Ohio. On average, 187 youth die by suicide every year in Ohio.

Mini grants will support community and school-based efforts to reduce stigma, promote education and awareness on suicide prevention, and increase resources and programs to reduce the risk of lives lost to suicide.

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Some schools will utilize funds to educate teachers and students on signs of suicide, start peer suicide prevention programs, and promote the Butler County Crisis Hotline 1-844-4CRISIS (or 1-844-427-4747), which is available for talk or text.

“We are looking forward to implementing new evidence based strategies to prevent students suicides, this funding allows us to further promote the health, safety, and well-being of our students, said Amy Macechko, the Health & Wellness Coordinator at the Talawanda School District.

The grants were given in partnership with the Engage 2.0 grant, which is supported by the Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services Agency and The Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.