Wright Airplane Factory buildings were occupied by Delphi until 2009. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
Photo: Ty Greenlees
Photo: Ty Greenlees

Congress OKs $450,000 for Wright brothers factory buildings

But the years-long quest to buy buildings 1 and 2, the first factory in the world to produce airplanes, is anything but over, officials say.

“It’s a small, positive step in a long, difficult march,” said Timothy Gaffney, a National Aviation Heritage Alliance spokesman.

The Park Service and the National Aviation Heritage Alliance have longed eyed the buildings in the hope the public would be able to see the site as part of the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park.

RELATED: Alliance in talks for Wright factory

Kendell Thompson, the parks’ acting superintendent, said Friday he was waiting to determine what the next step is in the process.

The historic buildings are part of a 54-acre parcel, site of the former Delphi Home Avenue plant, that has been put on the commercial market. The historic site at 2701 Home Ave. is between U.S. 35 and West Third Street near Abbey Avenue.

A previous plan to buy the entire site was scaled back, according to Tony Sculimbrene, executive director of the National Aviation Heritage Alliance, who has spent years in negotiations on the future of the historic location.

The complexity of negotiations has been complicated by former owner Delphi’s past bankruptcy, land covenants and environmental liability concerns, Sculimbrene said. Former auto parts production buildings were demolished and the site has been environmentally investigated and remediated under a $3 million Clean Ohio grant, officials said.

RELATED: Rare Wright brothers propeller headed from Dayton to Colorado museum

Hull & Associates/Home Avenue Redevelopment LLC purchased the site in 2012 with the intent to remediate environmental issues and sell it. The property is for sale on the commercial market.

Brad White, a managing partner of Home Avenue Redevelopment LLC, said the $450,000 appropriation was “good news” because the intent over the years was to sell the historic buildings to the National Park Service.

David Lotterer, vice president of commercial real estate broker JLL, which is marketing the property, declined comment Friday.

While the park service has eyed the two historic buildings, Dayton Metro Library plans to build a $10 million branch library on about seven and a half acres on the site have stalled because officials have not been able to reach a deal, the Dayton Daily News reported this month.

Dayton Metro Library executive director Tim Kambitsch said earlier this month the library did not want to move to the site on its own because of concerns incompatible uses might move in nearby, and it did not want to pay more than the property was valued.

RELATED: Backers want Ohio Aviation Hall of Fame at future monument site

NAHA’s long-term vision of the property would bring commercial and “complimentary” industrial redevelopment, such as advanced manufacturing, to the former factory site, Gaffney said.

Orville and Wilbur Wright’s airplane factory built 100 airplanes between 1910-1911. General Motors and later Delphi acquired the property, and built new factories to manufacture auto parts for decades. The Delphi plant was demolished in 2013.

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