The area’s significant rainfall from last weekend is believed to be the cause that led to part of Little Sugarcreek Road, just north of Ohio 725 in Bellbrook, to fall away.

Fix to Bellbrook road ‘large undertaking,’ likely to cost millions

The structural integrity of a portion of Little Sugarcreek Road is in question, and it could cost the city of Bellbrook millions of dollars to fix it.

A city-funded engineer’s study indicates the bedrock needs shored up underneath a portion of Little Sugarcreek Road where the edge started to slip away after heavy rains last February.

A more detailed analysis of the geology is needed, the study says, but work to fix just that portion underneath the roadway could cost the city $1.1 million. It could cost up to $7.2 million to fix the entire 2,600 feet of the roadway between Franklin Street and Vineyard Way in the city of Bellbrook, according to the study.

RELATED: Rain-damaged Little Sugarcreek Road closed for repairs

Council members noted at their meeting Monday that the project “is going to be one of the largest undertakings the city has had to deal with,” Bellbrook City Manager Melissa Dodd said.

“The total cost of the project exceeds our annual budget,” Dodd said. “This will more than likely happen in phases with the final phase being the addition of the sidewalk along the entire corridor.”

The report to the city is based on a study where engineers examined about a 300-foot portion underneath Little Sugarcreek Road. The east side of that portion of the roadway sunk by about 12 inches after a period of heavy rainfall, which led to travel restrictions on commercial trucks. City crews temporarily fixed the damaged area by back-filling it with gravel.

The study, which cost the city $24,800, indicates the bedrock slipped underneath the roadway where the damage occurred.

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The permanent solution, as recommended in the study provided by Engineer Dan Hoying, is to install three-foot and two-foot alternating pillars into the bedrock. The pillars must be driven about eight feet into the bedrock, and more borings into the soil are needed to determine exactly how deep the bedrock is from the surface.

Dodd said costs to do more borings will be factored into the city’s 2020 budget, adding that the additional work will help determine more precisely the total costs of the project.

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