$54,000 worth of UD law textbooks stolen; police seek suspects’ identities

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

$54,000 worth of UD law textbooks stolen; police seek suspects??€™ identities.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Nearly 300 textbooks, worth over $54,000, have been stolen from the University of Dayton School of Law since March, according to Dayton police.

Investigators are now asking for the public’s help to find one man and identify two other people suspected in the thefts.

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On June 30 alone, police said two men stole 99 new UD law school textbooks, valued over $20,900. During the theft June 12, four suspects stole 106 books, police said.

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One suspect, a man wearing a plaid shirt in the first photo, has been identified as Christopher Begley, 29 of Columbus, police said.

Begley was also seen in surveillance photos wearing a red sweatshirt, according to police.

He is believed to be involved in all the textbook thefts, according to investigators.

Christopher Begley, 29, captured on surveillance video stealing textbooks, police say. (Contributed photo/Dayton police)

Warrants for Begley’s arrest have been issued, investigators said.

Police are seeking the identity of three others, all considered suspects in some of the thefts.

The first suspect, a man wearing a black, short-sleeved shirt, was captured on surveillance video with Begley on June 12 and 30.

An unknown female suspect seen with the first unknown male, wearing a black shirt. (Contributed photo/Dayton police)

Police are also looking to identify a woman seen with the second man in a dock area during the theft on June 12.

Contributed Photo/Dayton police

In March, police said Begley sold some of the books to a Half Price Books location in Fairborn. However, those books have been located and recovered.

Anyone with information on the suspects or crimes, are asked to contact Miami Valley Crime Stoppers at 937-222-STOP.

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