Northmont students make unexpected presentation to governor

Students from Northmont met with state legislators at the State House to present their view on school safety. CONTRIBUTED. Students from Northmont get the chance to tell Governor Kasich about their ideas on school safety. CONTRIBUTED.
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Students from Northmont met with state legislators at the State House to present their view on school safety. CONTRIBUTED. Students from Northmont get the chance to tell Governor Kasich about their ideas on school safety. CONTRIBUTED.

Students from Northmont City Schools took a trip to the Statehouse for a presentation involving students’ feelings after the recent mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

After the Parkland, Florida, shooting, a group of Northmont students wanted to change student involvement regarding their safety at the school. The students split themselves up into three separate groups — Empathy, Legislative and Support — and began working on separate projects.

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The Legislative group surveyed classmates at Northmont and received 1,000 responses from their peers. The survey was based on questions dealing with opinions on gun control, adding more school resource officers, adding to the SRO training, more active shooter drills and feelings about the mass shooting in Florida and if they feel safe.

These students took their presentation to the Statehouse on Tuesday to talk to state senators and representatives. They met with Representatives Jeff Rezabek, R-Clayton, and Bill Beagle, R-Tipp City, and Senators Mike Henne, R-Clayton, and Peggy Lehner, R-Kettering.

Governor John Kasich unexpectedly met with students at the Statehouse for about 40 minutes. They presented their results from their survey and gave their recommendations to school safety.

“I am proud of our students for all their research,” said Northmont Schools Superintendent Tony Thomas. “They know an incredible amount of the legislation going on today.”

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The students in the Support group meet at 7 a.m. before school starts to think of ways to support the students and ways to work with school leaders on how to make the school safer.

The students in the Empathy group decided against participating in the National Walkout Day on March 14 and held an assembly in the Thunderdome, Northmont’s gymnasium. Students made presentations emphasizing that no one is alone.

“The students understand empathy and that every student belongs,” Thomas said.

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