Recent rain could result in a new round of mosquitoes

Bitter, cold temperatures this winter may cut down on the mosquito population this summer, but recent rain could turn houses into a breeding ground for the insects. 

Health experts said the cold winter killed a lot of eggs from last year, but standing water created by rain is the perfect environment for a new batch of the bugs. 

"When you have temperatures of 75 degrees the eggs can hatch into adult larvae in seven to 10 days," said Mark Isaacson with Greene County Public Health. 

 According to Isaacson, now is the time to check your property.

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He said mosquitoes, which can carry West Nile virus, lay their eggs in or near standing water in places like gutters, pools or buckets. 

Health officials said people can use mosquito traps, which can be found at local hardware stores, to keep mosquito larvae from hatching. They can be placed in pools or water that doesn't drain and are also safe for animals. 

Last year, a man from Xenia tested positive for West Nile virus. The county used larvacide to control the mosquitoes around his home. They also started checking other areas for the disease too. 

"So far in Greene County, we've tested nine mosquito pools and all have been negative for the West Nile virus," said Isaacson. 

He said, if necessary, the county will use spray or fog to control mosquitoes in neighborhoods. 

But the best way to control the bloodsuckers is to keep them away from water.

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