First plasma donation made by recovered coronavirus patient in Dayton region

ajc.com

A Brooklyn man living with family in Oakwood is the first recovered coronavirus patient to donate plasma in the area to help treat others battling the virus.

Menachem Mendel Mangel, 21, made the donation Monday at Community Blood Center.

>> RELATED: Local blood bank prepares to collect COVID-19 survivors’ plasma

Plasma from those recovered from coronavirus is in need as the CBC finalizes steps to open the convalescent plasma (CCP) program.

“The entire community worked with great intensity and purpose to make this happen,” said CBC Medical Director Dr. James Alexander. “In the end, we do what we do to help those that are in need and through the efforts of a great many people, we were able to accomplish that task. We hope to establish a CCP program for the community soon. We will do everything possible to meet the needs of our community.”

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The new treatment method, which health care officials hope will save lives, involves giving those who have been infected an infusion of blood plasma taken from COVID-19 survivors.

Although promising, convalescent plasma has not yet been proven effective in treating COVID-19, according to the Food and Drug Administration.
Mangel is the son of Rabbi Nochum Mangel of the Chabad Lubavitch of Greater Dayton synagogue.

He returned to Oakwood on March 16 to celebrate Passover and tested positive for coronavirus on March 18.

He donated plasma on April 6 after testing negative for the virus.

“My dad told me about donating (convalescent) plasma and I said I’d do it,” Menachem said. “It wasn’t too much of a debate. I’ve donated before and anything I can do to help.”

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“The entire community worked with great intensity and purpose to make this happen,” said Alexander. “In the end, we do what we do to help those that are in need and through the efforts of a great many people, we were able to accomplish that task. We hope to establish a CCP program for the community soon. We will do everything possible to meet the needs of our community.”

To be a potential CCP donor you must meet all standard screening criteria for blood donation, as well as pass the additional FDA criteria, which includes:

  • A previous diagnosis of coronavirus documented by a laboratory or doctor's note
  • Evidence of a lack of infection through testing or when one month has passed from complete resolution of symptoms

A physician also must determine that a potential donor meets the criteria before an appointment can be scheduled.