What we know about Dayton’s immigrant population

People celebrate after a ceremony and the oath of citizenship from U.S. District Judge Walter H. Rice during a naturalization ceremony in 2012. STAFF PHOTO

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People celebrate after a ceremony and the oath of citizenship from U.S. District Judge Walter H. Rice during a naturalization ceremony in 2012. STAFF PHOTO

Dayton has a low concentration of immigrants compared to many other U.S. communities.

But as this newspaper reported, Dayton's immigrant population has more than doubled since the mid-2000s and the pace of growth has been among the highest in the nation.

A new report by the Ohio Legal Assistance Foundation sheds some light on immigrants living in the Dayton region.

Here are some of the highlights of the data, which comes from the U.S. Census:

About 4.3 percent of Montgomery County’s population is foreign born, or 23,030 residents. Out of Ohio’s 13 largest counties, Montgomery County has the third-lowest percentage of foreign-born residents.

A greater share of immigrants in Montgomery County (38.9 percent) have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher educational credentials than the native-born population (25.5 percent). That also holds true in Ohio’s other 12 largest counties.

RELATED: Dayton’s immigrant population doubles: ‘You can get a better life’

About 60.7 percent of the county’s immigrants are either employed or unemployed but actively looking for work. That compares to about 61.8 percent of the native-born population that is in the labor force.

Immigrants in the county have higher rates of poverty but lower rates of unemployment than non-immigrant residents.

Ohio’s immigrants are less likely to divorce or separate than native-born families in the state.

In Montgomery County, more than two-thirds of immigrant households have married couples. About half of native-born households contain a married couple.

RELATED: Would you welcome an immigrant next door? Most in Dayton say yes

Foreign-born Ohio residents are less likely to be insured and more likely to live in married households with children.

Most Dayton residents have said they are OK with having immigrants as neighbors.

Last year, a citywide survey last year found that 56 percent of residents said they agree or strongly agree with the statement, “I would be supportive if an immigrant family moved in next door to me.”

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