Raucous RNC: Highlights from Monday's opening day

4 highlights from Monday’s opening night of Republican convention

Melania wows GOP convention crowd

With the recent terror attacks in Orlando and France, security was the main topic of the night.

A parade of speakers told stories about loved ones killed while serving in the military or at the hands of people in the United States illegally. And they cast the turbulent times as a direct result of weak leadership by President Barack Obama and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, who spent four years in the administration.

“Who would trust Hillary Clinton to protect them? I wouldn’t,” Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said in one of the night’s most fiery addresses.

Republicans also highlighted at length the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya, while Clinton was serving as secretary of state. The mother of one of the victims choked back tears as she personally blamed Clinton for her son’s death and accused her of giving a false explanation for the attack.

“If Hilary Clinton can’t give us the truth, why should we give her the presidency,” Pat Smith said.

2. Dump Trump forces make final push

Over angry and prolonged objections from anti-Donald Trump forces, Republican Party leaders approved rules for their national convention on Monday and rejected demands for a state-by-state roll call vote, a discordant start to a gathering designed to project unity.

>>> Last effort to change the rules

Hundreds of socially conservative delegates opposed to nominating Trump bellowed in outrage after the convention’s presiding officer, Arkansas GOP Rep. Steve Womack, abruptly put the rules to a vote and declared them approved by voice, not an individual tally of each state’s delegation.

Though likely to lose, the dissidents had demanded a roll call.

“Call the roll, call the roll,” opponents shouted. Practically drowning them out were chants of “USA, USA” by Trump supporters and party loyalists.

The defeated mavericks reacted angrily, with some delegates leaving the convention floor and others vowing to not help Trump.

3. Peaceful so far

With police on edge in this summer of bloodshed, hundreds of Donald Trump supporters and foes held dueling rallies a half-mile apart Monday in a tense but mostly peaceful start to the four-day Republican National Convention.

About a dozen Trump backers showed up with handguns strapped to their belts as allowed under Ohio law. Blocks away, protesters shouted about police mistreatment.

People along the streets showered police officers with applause, hugs and a few insults.

No major clashes were reported between pro- and anti-Trump forces during the two biggest demonstrations on Monday’s schedule or at rallies held in the later afternoon and early evening.

“So far, so good,” Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams said at a Monday night press briefing. Williams said there had been no violence and no property damage.

4. Celebrities take the stage

From Duck Dynasty’s Willie Robertson to Scott Baio an Antonio Sabato Jr there were celeberities all over the Republican National Convention.

Cleveland’s own Don King showed up. The former manager of Heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson is a big Donald Trump fan.

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