From left: Danielle Ohl, Phil Davis, Rachael Pacella, and Selene San Felice, reporters at the Capital Gazette, address the crowd during a vigil for the victims of the newsroom shooting in Annapolis, Md., June 29, 2018. The crowd held candles and passed around white flowers in the fading light and stifling heat, trying to make sense of a new front in mass shootings: an attack on a local newspaper. (Ryan Christopher Jones/The New York Times)

AMELIA ROBINSON: You or I could be a victim of the next mass shooting

Selene San Felice’s predictions came true.

We moved on.

In the hours after her newsroom became the latest setting for a mass shooting, San Felice appeared on CNN to predict that that the legs on the massacre that claimed five lives — Rob Hiaasen, Wendy Winters, John McNamara, Rebecca Smith and Gerald Fischman — were very short.

U.S. newsrooms fall silent to honor 5 slain at Maryland paper

The story would be in the news for about a week, San Felice told CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

It is no surprise the reporter who covered the Pulse nightclub shooting, while a student in Florida, was right.

We always move on in no time flat.

We moved on after Sandy Hook; the Las Vegas shootingthe San Bernadino attackStoneman Douglas High School; Columbine; the congressional baseball gameEmanuel African Methodist Episcopal church

>>RELATED: Families of Sandy Hook victims confront mass shootings head-on in new PSA

Perhaps we have short attention spans; don’t think there is an answer; have gotten used to it; didn’t notice; really don’t care; are too busy; have thrown our hands up in the air …

Time and time again, a debate involving mental health and gun access rises to the surface and then sinks back down to the ocean floor.

All the while, there is always another mass shooting in the wings. (Insert name of church, office, stadium, festival, city, school, movie theater, dance club or public street here.)

Like the 5-year-olds in Sandy Hook and the good Christians at Emanuel church, San Felice’s colleagues at the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Md., didn’t see it coming.

How could they have?

Their accused murder had made threats in the past to the newsroom, but journalists have gotten threats long before we were painted as the enemy of the people.

>>AMELIA ROBINSON: That time I fired an AK47: Shooting to learn what’s so great about guns

In the course of doing my job, I have been called a n*gger; a b*tch; a wh*re; a f*g lover; a liberal; stupid; fascist; ugly; fat; liar, a race traitor; fake news; a POS …

I have been threatened and lived in fear. I’ve worried about layoffs and watched great journalists lose their jobs. I’ve embraced new storytelling tools and watched society shift farther away from facts.

It is not easy being a journalist, and it never has been.

 

Despite it all, I love my job and know I contribute to society.

And like my journalism brothers and sisters who died at the Capital, the concert-goers, teenagers and the movie fans, I would never see it coming.

The fact is that you, I and/or someone we love could be a victim of the next mass shooting the nation talks about for a week before moving on.

Perhaps we have short attention spans; don’t think there is an answer; have gotten used to it; didn’t notice; really don’t care; are too busy; have thrown our hands up in the air …

Thank you for reading the Dayton Daily News and for supporting local journalism. Subscribers: log in for access to your daily ePaper and premium newsletters.

Thank you for supporting in-depth local journalism with your subscription to the Dayton Daily News. Get more news when you want it with email newsletters just for subscribers. Sign up here.

X