UD Police: St. Patrick’s Day yielded fewer citations this year

University of Dayton Police said they issued fewer citations on St. Patrick’s Day this year than in previous years.
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University of Dayton Police said they issued fewer citations on St. Patrick’s Day this year than in previous years.

St. Patrick’s Day was noticeably quieter at the University of Dayton than in previous years.

UD Police issued 18 alcohol-related citations on the holiday that doubled as a game day for the Flyers who lost in the first round of the March Madness tournament to Wichita State.

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“St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in the student neighborhoods resulted in fewer police actions this year. Students generally were cooperative and abided by University regulations,” according to a prepared statement from the college.

University police only issued two drug-related citations and six for disorderly conduct, according to crime logs. The same day two people were also cited for breaking “university policy,” which on St. Patrick’s Day is typically one of UD’s alcohol-related rules, said spokeswoman Cilla Shindell.

Combined, UD Police police and state agencies issued a total of 23 citations for underage drinking, public intoxication and open container violations, according to the university.

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Of the people cited, 14 were UD students, according to the university. Another 13 students were also referred to UD’s student disciplinary process for violations stemming from the holiday weekend.

The citations issued throughout St. Patrick’s Day weekend were comparable to an average weekend during the previous month, the Dayton Daily News found.

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