Valley View, MVCTC not going back on Aug. 8 ballot

Valley View Intermediate School was built in 1922 in Germantown and added onto between 1951 and 1962. The state rated the school’s condition as “poor.” Valley View’s school bond issue would have raised money to demolish all four existing schools and build three new ones. JEREMY P. KELLEY / STAFF
Caption
Valley View Intermediate School was built in 1922 in Germantown and added onto between 1951 and 1962. The state rated the school’s condition as “poor.” Valley View’s school bond issue would have raised money to demolish all four existing schools and build three new ones. JEREMY P. KELLEY / STAFF

Valley View schools and the Miami Valley Career Technology Center are not going back on the Aug. 8 ballot to seek approval of bond levies that were rejected in May.

For Valley View, that marks the end of their shot at this state funding cycle — although it doesn’t close the door for state facilities funding in the future.

RELATED: Valley View was one of five with bond issues in November

Miami Valley CTC is on a different timeline, according to the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission, and its state funding would be available at the same percentage in the November or May 2018 election.

Valley View

The district had hoped to replace two 1920s school buildings, a 1950 elementary and the 1968 high school with three buildings on existing sites, via a 5.39-mill bond, with the state paying 53 percent of demolition/construction costs.

The state rated all but the high school with their lowest rating of “poor,” while the high school was called “borderline.”

RELATED: Valley View community split on levy

Superintendent Rick Earley said Valley View has to do something to upgrade its facilities, but he said everything is still on the table for now.

“Anytime it’s defeated twice, I think you have to say, let’s go back to the very beginning and see what’s the best way to go,” Earley said.

Miami Valley CTC

Voters rejected MVCTC’s first attempt to pass a state-match bond issue May 2 by a 52-48 ratio.

The bond would have helped pay for about $62.5 million worth of additional classroom space, upgraded technology and improved safety at the 50-year-old campus in Clayton. The state would have paid 47 percent.

RELATED: MVCTC considers next steps

“At this point, we have to sit down and look at the data. We have so many different precincts because we serve 27 different districts,” Superintendent Nick Weldy said. “We need to sit down and look at what the voters told us and look at what other issues won.”

About the Author