Want to join a LEGO building team? UD is sponsoring one for kids

Participants compete in the FIRST LEGO League competition. UD is sponsoring a team for the league.
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Participants compete in the FIRST LEGO League competition. UD is sponsoring a team for the league.

Parents looking for something for their child to do this summer may be in luck as their kids can now apply to join a “LEGO League Team.”

The BinaryMcBrickBots FIRST LEGO League Team is accepting applications by email through June 29 for competitions in 2018 and 2019. The team is sponsored by and housed at the University of Dayton's School of Engineering, according to a press release calling for applications.

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The team will practice together for several weeks and will then compete to design, build and program a robot using LEGO’s Mindstorms technology, according to the league’s website. The team and competition are designed to engage kids in critical thinking in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

Applicants must be 9 years old to 14 years old and do not need to have had any prior experience using LEGO Mindstorms tech, according to the team.

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Team members will be notified that they have been selected by July 6 and at that time will need to pay a non-refundable $150 registration fee.

The league was started in 1998 by LEGO Group owner and deputy chairman Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen and FIRST founder Dean Kamen, according to the organization’s website. Since then more than 250,000 people from 88 countries have participated in the league’s competition in which more than 32,000 LEGO robots have been built.

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