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Wright-Patt hospital: What we know about the base medical center

An active shooter situation has been reported at the medical center on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The base’s security forces and fire department responded to the incident at 12:40 p.m., said Marie Vanover, Wright-Patt director of public affairs. The “all clear” has since been given on the base.

Here is what we know about Wright-Patterson medical center on the base.

1. When was the medical center built?

Wright-Patterson Medical Center was originally built in 1956.

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Most recently the hospital underwent $99 million in renovations that started in January 2012.

» RELATED: All-clear given in active shooter situation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

The massive renovation was dubbed Gateway to Health Care and 1,000 construction workers labored on the project originally budgeted at $115 million.

The hospital was first renovated and expanded in the 1980s.

2. How big is Wright-Patt medical center?

The medical center is the second largest in the United States Air Force.

The center has about a $140 million budget, 2,100 employees and treats tens of thousands of patients every year. The hospital has more than 4,000 annual admissions, according to its license.

The hospital won top inpatient satisfaction scores in 2012 and 2013 in the service branch, and the highest marks for outpatient treatment in three of four quarters last year, based on patient surveys.

» RELATED: WPAFB active shooter situation: Reactions from the scene

3. Another incident occurred at the hospital in 2011

A man attempted to commit suicide at the hospital in June 2011 when he fired a gun in the emergency room.

The man, described as appearing intoxicated or distraught, entered the emergency room with a 9 mm handgun at 6:30 p.m. June 11, 2011.

The lone shot he fired seemed to be aimed at his own body, but he was not struck, and no one was injured, according to the base’s public affairs office. He surrendered to base security forces.

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