Wright State’s interim president will make nearly $120K in 106 days

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Caption
Wright State president David Hopkins resigned Friday, months before he planned to retire.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Wright State interim president Curtis McCray, who was hired to help the university with its budget crisis, will be paid $119,892 for the 106 days he will serve as the school’s top leader.

McCray will be compensated $1,131 a day, according to his contract agreement with the university obtained by this news organization.

RELATED: Wright State’s president resigns, citing ongoing budget issues

McCray began his less than four-month stint at Wright State on Monday after president David Hopkins announced his resignation on Friday. McCray has so far declined requests for an interview and to answer questions about potential cuts that will made at the university.

McCray’s duties as interim president mostly pertain to stabilizing the university’s finances, according to his contract. The agreement calls on McCray to eliminate a budget deficit of $30 million and increase the university’s reserves to a $5 million surplus.

McCray’s contract says he must eliminate the deficit while maintaining the college’s “core athletic programs at a NCAA Division I standing.” The contract did not specify what is considered a “core” program.

This media outlet is asking questions about the school’s athletic programs.

ExploreRELATED: WSU slashes layoff notice period for 1,000 as cuts loom

The contract also requires McCray to modify or eliminate “redundant positions or personnel within the university.” Layoffs are expected to be announced next month, officials have said.

McCray is expected to communicate and coordinate with incoming WSU president Cheryl Schrader on the financial steps he takes, according to the contract. Schrader takes office on July 1.

Wright State officials have been looking for solutions as its unrestricted reserve fund has dropped from more than $100 million in 2012 to $12.9 million as of June 30. Overspending, officials said, is the cause of WSU’s financial problems as the university is on track to spend $40 million more than it brought in this year, according to a cash projection.

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Along with his salary, McCray will also be reimbursed for any university-related travel and is eligible for vacation and sick leave, according to his contract. McCray will not receive any payout for unused vacation or sick time when he leaves office at the end of June.

McCray can also make use of the university’s health insurance program if he chooses to, according to the contract.

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