Dayton defense contractor lands $100,000 Third Frontier grant

Step inside the completed offices of defense technology companies Battle Sight Technologies and Mile 2 at The Manhattan, a.k.a. J.K. McIntire Building, built in 1912 and located at 601 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton. OM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
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Step inside the completed offices of defense technology companies Battle Sight Technologies and Mile 2 at The Manhattan, a.k.a. J.K. McIntire Building, built in 1912 and located at 601 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton. OM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Funds will help refine ColdFIRE photoluminescent powder

Dayton’s Battle Sight Technologies has landed a $100,000 grant from the Ohio Third Frontier Technology Validation and Start-up Fund.

The money will be used to further test and refine a new product to help distinguish friend from foe on the nighttime battlefield.

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The Dayton business said it is the only company to receive the Ohio grant twice. The company first won the grant in 2018.

“I believe Ohio is a growing force in the emerging technologies marketplace and it’s exciting to impact state and local economies through the creation of technology-focused jobs,” said Nick Ripplinger, president of Battle Sight and a U.S. Army veteran. “We anticipate significant growth over the course of the next four years from our Dayton headquarters.”

The company’s focus today is commercialization of its new Infrared signal technology, called “ColdFIRE.”

Battle Sight said ColdFIRE, a photoluminescent, industrial powder, emits lights in near-infrared and short-wave infrared wavelengths once activated by an ambient light source.

“The emitted light is visible only through night vision optics and the powders are easily incorporated into user-friendly form factors such as films, tapes, bands, and patches, among others, for military use,” the Dayton company said.

“The significant manufacturing flexibility associated with ColdFIRE and the wide variety of potential form factors creates almost limitless options for deployment,” said Chris Vogt, Battle Sight’s chief operating officer.

Early in its history, Battle Sight worked with the Entrepreneurs’ Center in Dayton as a client in the center’s Entrepreneurial Services Provider program, a $20 million initiative with the state of Ohio guiding new businesses.

“Our ESP program was founded to support tech entrepreneurs like Nick. He’s a powerhouse visionary whose passion and determination to create products that make it safer for frontline workers to do their jobs is admirable,” said Scott Koorndyk, president of the Entrepreneurs Center.

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