Dayton may crack down on unlicensed massage parlors

City of Dayton officials say a crackdown on unlicensed massage parlors could also help licensed businesses in the city. SARAH CAVENDER/STAFF PHOTO
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City of Dayton officials say a crackdown on unlicensed massage parlors could also help licensed businesses in the city. SARAH CAVENDER/STAFF PHOTO

Dayton’s elected leaders this week had the first reading of an ordinance that would ban unlicensed massage establishments.

The proposed legislation also would require that massage therapy businesses only use licensed massage therapists for these services.

Explore2020 story: Beavercreek law tightens massage restrictions

The Dayton Police Department has asked the city to approve the legislation, claiming it will help combat human trafficking, labor trafficking and prostitution.

“Additionally, it will also add credibility to massage businesses and therapists that do operate in Dayton,” says a memo from interim police director and chief Matt Carper to the city manager.

The proposed legislation would take effect Jan. 1, 2022, and violations would start as a fourth-degree misdemeanor and escalate from there.

Establishments in violation of the new regulations may be deemed a public nuisance. They also would be subject to inspection from police officers, zoning officials, public health officials and other agencies.

Explore2019 story: Fairborn massage parlor raided in prostitution probe

Hospitals, medical facilities and public health centers will be exempt from theses requirements, and so will licensed cosmetologists, registered barbers or nail salon technicians who administer massages only to the scalp, face, neck, shoulder, feet or hands, the legislation states.

Other exempt jobs include licensed chiropractors, podiatrists, nurses and sports trainers.

Beavercreek, Kettering, Springboro, Fairborn and Miamisburg are among other local cities to pass recent legislation regulating unlicensed massage parlors.

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