Dayton plans to make Wright Dunbar, East Dayton more bike friendly

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Dayton adds miles of new bike lanes. More to come.

The city of Dayton has installed more than five miles of new bike lanes in the past several years, and it plans to add new bike infrastructure on West Third Street in the Wright Dunbar area and on Xenia Avenue in East Dayton.

In the next few months, the city expects to issue bids for a two-way cycle track along the main commercial corridor through the Wright Dunbar Business District, which would the be city’s first protected cycling track.

Later this month, the city will host an online public meeting to collect feedback about proposed bike lanes on Xenia Avenue, which could be constructed in 2023.

“We are trying to install bike infrastructure wherever we can make safe connections throughout city,” said Joseph Weinel, chief engineer with the city of Dayton.

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A man rides a motorized bicycle in East Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

A man rides a motorized bicycle in East Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

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A man rides a motorized bicycle in East Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

Since 2018, the city has installed nearly 5.4 miles of bike lanes, which includes bikeways on Valley Street (Troy to Rita streets); Monument Avenue (North Main to Wilkinson streets); Jefferson Street (East Sixth to Buckeye streets); and East Fourth and Wayne Avenue.

Combined, these projects cost about $1.75 million, though the Valley Street bikeway was part of a larger project. The projects were funded with federal money and local matches of usually about 25% of project cost.

The city also added bike lanes on Springfield Street in East Dayton and on Jefferson Street in downtown, from East Sixth Street to Monument Avenue.

Weinel said the city will soon seek bids for a two-way cycling track on West Third Street that will be constructed along the eastbound curb lane.

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Teens cross Xenia Avenue on Monday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

Teens cross Xenia Avenue on Monday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

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Teens cross Xenia Avenue on Monday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The cycling track, which is expected to cost about $340,000, will stretch from Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to Williams Street. The project is expected to take about three months to complete and will be built later this year to line up with the opening of the replaced Third Street Bridge, Weinel said.

The track will provide physical protection from the street via a two-foot concrete curb, which he said creates a bike path-feel that many people like for safety reasons.

“You’re kind of separated and you’re not in moving with the traffic,” he said.

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Proposed bike lanes and upgrades for Xenia Avenue. CONTRIBUTED

Proposed bike lanes and upgrades for Xenia Avenue. CONTRIBUTED

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Proposed bike lanes and upgrades for Xenia Avenue. CONTRIBUTED

Work on the Springfield Street bikeway should wrap up likely in May or June once asphalt and pavement markings can be installed, Weinel said.

On March 29, the city will host a public meeting on Microsoft Teams to discuss a proposed bike lane on Xenia Avenue from Keowee Street to Linden Avenue. People can watch and participate by visiting www.daytonohio.gov/XeniaAvenueBikeLanesMeeting.

The proposed project seeks to upgrade Xenia Avenue with new or improved pavement, curb ramps and sidewalks, and a bike path connection from Highland Hills Avenue to the Steve Whalen bike path.

Under the proposal, Xenia Avenue would not be widened, though some on-street parking will be eliminated.

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A rendering of the proposed Xenia Avenue bike lanes. CONTRIBUTED

A rendering of the proposed Xenia Avenue bike lanes. CONTRIBUTED

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A rendering of the proposed Xenia Avenue bike lanes. CONTRIBUTED

“This is just a plan right ― nothing has been finalized on this, which is why we want to get people’s input,” he said.

The city might adjust its design based on residents’ feedback.

The project could add signage and pavement markings along Xenia Avenue from Keowee Street to McClure Street to encourage bicyclists and motorists to share the road.

The city proposes constructing dedicated bike lanes in each direction, between McClure Street and Linden Avenue.

The project, which is intended to improve access between eastern neighborhoods and downtown, is expected to begin in spring 2023 and take about six months to complete.

The city says pedestrian traffic on Xenia Avenue is hindered by damaged sidewalks, and bike lanes will calm traffic and improve the travel experience for cyclists and pedestrians.

New bike infrastructure also should benefit Xenia Avenue’s business district, Weinel said.

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