Franklin narrowing search for new finance director

Franklin City Council is interviewing several people seeking to be the city's next finance director. ED RICHTER/STAFF

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Franklin City Council is interviewing several people seeking to be the city's next finance director. ED RICHTER/STAFF

City Council expected to select new finance director July 18

Franklin City Council interviewed two finalists for the position of finance director and is expected to decide on which candidate will get the job next month.

The finance director’s position has been vacant since April 29 after Cindy Ryan left after three years to become controller/director of accounting services for Sinclair Community College. Amy Miller has been working as interim finance director until the new finance director is appointed by council.

Miller, who is a retired city finance employee, had served as interim finance director before Ryan was hired.

Seventeen people applied for the position, then city staff identified six candidates, one of whom withdrew from consideration before the city staff interviews, said City Manager Jonathan Westendorf.

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He said the field was narrowed down to two men, Keith Baldwin of Lebanon, and Matt Dillon of Dayton. Both were interviewed by council during an executive session at its June 20 meeting.

“We expect council to make a decision at its next meeting on July 18,” Westendorf said.

Baldwin earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Cincinnati, and a master’s degree in business administration from Xavier University. He previously worked in roles at Xavier University, Duke Energy, Cinergy, and the Formica Corporation.

Dillon is currently the finance director for the village of Yellow Springs.He has also held roles as a real estate finance manager for FIS Global; and with the city of Cincinnati as a senior management analyst-budget and evaluation.

Dillon holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from West Virginia University; a master’s degree in public administration and a master’s degree in city and regional planning, both from The Ohio State University.

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