ON YOUR MIND: The Dayton mayor’s workload, the impeachment trial and ‘unrelenting hate’

DAYTON’S PART-TIME v. FULL-TIME MAYOR

Dayton already has a full-time mayor, they just don’t want to pay the salary that goes with it. All of the talk about the mayor becoming too political if it is a full-time position is just a distraction.

MARIE VAN SCHAILK MCMANUS, DAYTON

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WHO IS GOING TO QUELL THIS UNRELENTING HATE?

When you’re a woman in her late 60s, you’ve lived long enough to see a lot of upheavals.

Throughout my life, there was segregation and integration. There were lynchings, assassinations and violence. There were riots, protests, police brutality and the institution of the draft for Vietnam.

There were the indictments of the Nixon officials and his resignation and subsequent pardoning. In 2000 we had one of the closest elections in U.S. history, but throughout all the turmoil, I never saw sedition or insurrection created by anyone, especially our elected leaders.

So, for me, the bigger worry is what is happening in the country now, not only in the last year but the last, say 12 years. What tipped the scale? Was it the election of the first African American president or the rise of conservative media blasting hateful racist rhetoric, causing fear of losing their white privilege?

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Why did more than 70 million citizens still vote for Trump and the Republican Party after four years of lies, corruption, and very little legislation albeit the judges and trillion-dollar tax cut for the rich?

Someone, please explain it to me. We have brilliant scientists working globally on the pandemic and one day soon it will be managed, but who is going to quell this unrelenting hate and violent vitriol that has reared its ugly head out of the sewers?

It’s time for truth, not theories.

PEGGY CARROLL COGGINS, CENTERVILLE

NOTE FROM COMMUNITY IMPACT EDITOR AMELIA ROBINSON: U.S. Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio was interviewed by CNN’s Dana Bash on Sunday, Jan. 31. Portman told Bash that he thought former President Donald Trump was partly responsible for the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol, but he questioned the constitutionality of trying Trump in the Senate after he has left office. Readers were asked their thoughts on Portman’s comments. Read a transcript of Portman’s comments published on this page Feb. 1 or at DaytonDailyNews.com.

COULD PAST PRESIDENT BE IMPACTED BY IMPEACHMENT PRECEDENT AS PORTMAN SAYS?

There are only two penalties for being convicted as a result of impeachment: removal from office and disqualification from holding future federal office. There are no fines or imprisonment penalties.

Sen. Portman only addressed removal from office, and not disqualification from future office. If it is constitutional to hold the trial, then so is the outcome. Conviction would disqualify Trump from becoming president in a future election.

How can any past presidents be impacted by out-of-office conviction?

Remember the only penalty is disqualification from future office. For instance, if Carter was convicted for incompetence in the Iran Hostage Rescue he could not run for president again.

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The others are two term presidents, so they can’t become senators or ambassadors. Could Congress hold “show trials” of past elected officials?

Sure, if they hold the required majorities. Do the voter have patience for such an abuse of power by Congress? If not, those politicians would be held accountable in the next election.

What about impeachment, conviction of past cabinet secretaries, etc.? This would disqualify them from serving future administrations. Show trials maybe more likely. Again the impeachers must hold both majorities, with a super majority of senators to convict.

CHARLES STEVENS, RIVERSIDE

PORTMAN PICKING LOOPHOLE

In reading (Portman’s comments), I was wondering what the proper process for prosecuting President Trump’s actions are. I see three alternatives:

1) Impeachment

2) Arresting and going through the courts

3) Letting if fall through the cracks (aka loophole)

Since Senator Portman is questioning No. 1, which alternative would he approve?

BILL SKELLY, BEAVERCREEK