One contested ward race for a seat on Springboro City Council

City of Springboro. LAWRENCE BUDD / STAFF
Caption
City of Springboro. LAWRENCE BUDD / STAFF

Credit: Lawrence Budd

Credit: Lawrence Budd

Economic development and city finances are top issues for both candidates

All four ward seats on Springboro City Council are open this fall, but only one race to represent Ward 3 is being contested in the Nov. 2 general election.

Incumbent Councilman John “Jack” Hanson, Jr. is being challenged by Austin Kaiser for a full four-year term. Hanson was appointed in 2019 after the resignation of Carol Dorsey.

Ward 3 is the area east of Ohio 741 (Main Street in Springboro) and south of Lytle-Five Points Road.

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Jack Hanson, 57, said he’s running for a full term on council because of his love for the community and the people of Springboro has always been his priority. Hanson wants to keep Springboro a family-friendly town where everyone wants their children to grow up in and that everyone fell in love with.

“I will continue to serve this great community with the utmost integrity, honesty, and transparency,” he said. “I will work tirelessly to to keep Springboro the place we love to live, work, and play in.”

Hanson has lived in the city for the past 22 years and is chief executive officer of Syzygy Venture Group LLC and has been a high school history teacher for 27 years. He and his wife have two sons, a daughter, and a granddaughter.

John "Jack" Hanson
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John "Jack" Hanson

Hanson also has a long history of community service record that includes service in the Ohio Army National Guard, a career with the Air Force in addition to serving on city council, various city advisory committees, and in several community events.

As for the top three issues facing Springboro, Hanson identified economic development, the city budget, and technology.

He said independent businesses from craft breweries to design firms, bakeries, and salons are popping up on Springboro’s streets. Hanson said these businesses and their job growth are essential to the city’s future and enhance our quality of life. He said he is committed to making it easier for entrepreneurs to start or grow their business in Springboro.

Hanson also said fiscal discipline will continue to be a priority and is committed to raising the level of city services without raising taxes. He said technology will continue to be important as investing in it will allow the city to be better connected and a more productive community, and attract businesses. Hanson said work is already being done to expand wi-fi connectivity throughout the city and accessible to all.

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Austin Kaiser said he’s running for Springboro City Council to be a voice for the common citizen.

“Too often politicians do not take the time to hear from their constituents, and I pledge to be different,” he said. “I will offer quarterly meetings for my constituents, so we can discuss issues that are important to them. I want to bring a new generation of leadership to our great community. More than anything, I want to represent my fellow residents.”

Austin Kaiser
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Austin Kaiser

A lifelong Springboro resident, Kaiser, 30, is a real estate manager and developer in addition to pursing a doctorate in public administration. He and his fiancée live in the city with their two dogs. He’s a first-time candidate but has volunteered for other candidates in the past.

Three issues facing Springboro identified by Kaiser includes transparency, smart growth, and city spending.

Kaiser said the city needs to improve on being more transparent by participating in Ohio’s Open Checkbook, an online program which allows anyone to view where their tax dollars are spent. He said Springboro is the only major community in Warren County that has not implemented this program and will propose bringing the platform to the city.

Kaiser said he’ll be a taxpayer watchdog on city spending and wants to see term limits set for council members at two terms office. Kaiser said fresh ideas are needed in government and implementing term limits will help ensure more people are heard.

He said the city is experiencing significant growth and he’ll be an advocate for bringing new businesses to Springboro.

“I am a proponent of development, but I am not a proponent of development without plans for bringing businesses to our community,” Kaiser said. “I believe Springboro’s best years are ahead, and with a new generation of leadership we can implement fresh ideas and become the model community for southwest Ohio. Springboro City Council needs honesty, transparency, and professionalism to lead the city into the future.”

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