UD gets $1.92 million to focus on community mental health services

ajc.com

The University of Dayton received a $1.92 million federal grant to improve access to mental health services and to improve quality because of the shortage of mental health workers in the region.

The grant will also assist mental health services for children and allow cooperation with 41 community partners in southwest and central Ohio, a university release said.

Those partners include law enforcement, hospitals, juvenile courts, public health boards, educational service centers, mental health agencies, schools and faith-based organizations from the Dayton, Springfield, London, Columbus and Middletown areas.

“The Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training Program will allow us to strengthen partnerships between mental health and public service providers to bring holistic health services to children and families in underserved areas,” said Meredith Montgomery, assistant professor and clinical coordinator in the UD Department of Counselor Education and Human Services.

The majority of the grant will go to students who are in clinical training to be clinical mental health counselors, school counselors, clinical psychologists and school psychologists. The work that students perform in their clinicals will meet the learning requirements for licensure in their respective fields while giving them a broader understanding of their local community recourses.

The funds are provided by the American Rescue plan and will allow the university to place 120 mental health students at clinical sites in higher need and higher demand areas over four years. The program will also bolster recruitment of students to careers in their desired mental health and research fields.

The four-year initiative begins July 1.

For more information, contact Meredith Montgomery, assistant professor and clinical coordinator in the UD Department of Counselor Education and Human Services, at mmontgomery2@udayton.edu.