Kettering officials settle boundary changes with Centerville

Kettering city officials have agreed to move forward on legislation recently approved by the Centerville City Council to that effectively moves forward with a boundary adjustment between the two cities. The move involves a portion of Pondview Park as well as 12 residential parcels.
Kettering city officials have agreed to move forward on legislation recently approved by the Centerville City Council to that effectively moves forward with a boundary adjustment between the two cities. The move involves a portion of Pondview Park as well as 12 residential parcels.

Kettering city officials have agreed to move forward on legislation recently approved by the Centerville City Council that effectively moves forward with a boundary adjustment between the two cities.

The move involves a portion of Pondview Park, as well as 12 residential parcels.

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The area is in the vicinity of Bigger Road and Interstate 675. The adjustment clarifies a boundary issue for the historic Pondview Park, which Kettering has maintained for years, although some of the property falls into Centerville’s jurisdiction.

Kettering Assistant City Manager Steve Bergstresser told council Tuesday night that the ordinance will provide by mutual agreement the adjustment of corporate boundaries in three separate areas.

The areas include Pondview Park in Kettering, Mount Vernon Estates plat in Centerville, and along Rahn Road, Walford Drive and Dobbs Drive areas.

“All of these corporate boundary adjustments are minor in nature and will correct discrepancies between the platted lots and the corporate boundaries,” Bergstresser said.

Centerville spokeswoman Kate Bostdorff said that, in total, 12 residential parcels will be affected and 11 will transfer to Centerville, while one will transfer to Kettering.

“In most cases, the existing boundaries bisect the backyards of these properties,” Bostdorff said. “Also, a portion of Pondview Park — which is currently in Centerville — will transfer to Kettering, which maintains and operates the park.”

According to the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office, any two adjoining municipal corporations may agree to change a boundary line.

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Kettering city officials also took care of some legislative housekeeping that has become necessary due to the coronavirus outbreak.

The city is canceling board, commission and council workshop meetings through April 30, but regularly scheduled council meetings are going to held as usual.

Council passed an emergency ordinance extending the time for hearing applications and appeals.

“Certain applications and appeals must be heard and decided during public meetings,” Bergstresser said. “Due to the coronavirus pandemic, and emergency orders requiring social distancing, it may not be prudent or possible to hold a public meeting within the required time.”

City officials were also in compliance for social distancing during the meeting last week, operating at a six-foot distance from each other.

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Councilman Bruce Duke phoned into the meeting and explained that while he and his wife were traveling recently they had been exposed to someone who had tested positive for the coronavirus and were now in self-quarantine at home.

“My wife and I were traveling out-of-state and when we got home, we found out that we had been in contact with someone that had tested positive for the coronavirus,” Duke told council. “We have been in our home for the past two weeks and that is why I am not in chambers this evening and tomorrow (Wednesday) is our last day in self-quarantine.”

He added, “I wanted to share with the community, if this happens to you, it’s not that bad. Residents have been helping us with meals. People will pitch in and help you. I just want to let the citizens know, please stay inside if this happens to you and continue to shelter-in-place. That is the only way we are going to beat this thing.”

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Mayor Don Patterson said city employees and first responders are doing a great job on the front lines as the city comes together to combat the COVID-19 situation.

“Follow the governor’s stay-at-home request,” Patterson said. “If you follow those guidelines, we will get through this a lot quicker and a lot safer and with a lot less heartache.”