Dayton Ohio State Highway Patrol trooper fired for OVI case gets reinstated

David G. Shockey
David G. Shockey

An Ohio State Highway Patrol Dayton Post trooper fired in December after being charged with OVI has reached a deal to be reinstated, state records show.

Records obtained by the Dayton Daily News state David G. Shockey was reinstated to the rank of trooper Tuesday after an agreement was reached that morning.

A grievance settlement agreement dated March 31 involving the OSHP, the Ohio State Troopers Association and Shockey indicates he will serve a 109-day suspension starting from his Dec. 20 termination date. It also states Shockey, 45, will receive no back pay during that time.

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He returned to work Tuesday, Lt. Craig Cvetan, OSHP public affairs commander, stated in an email.

Shockey, a 20-year veteran, also signed a five-year last-chance agreement dated April 7, state records show.

The Ohio Department of Public Safety “will hold the termination in abeyance provided” Shockey “does not violate the terms” of the deal, documents show.

The OSHP “denies any liability in connection with the alleged claim,” records state.

The grievance settlement was signed by Ohio State Troopers Association attorney Elaine Silveria. Attempts to reach her Tuesday afternoon were unsuccessful.

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Among the terms in the two documents, Shockey has agreed to:

•Be assigned to the Piqua post and agree not to transfer to the Dayton post for five years.

•Have a valid Ohio driver’s license upon returning to work.

•Not violate rules involving conduct unbecoming an officer.

•Not violate rules for use of alcohol.

•Be referred to a substance abuse treatment program with certified completion.

•Submit to random drug and alcohol screenings for five years with cost paid by the employee.

EARLIER: Ohio State Highway Patrol fires Dayton trooper after OVI arrest

Shockey was fired for “conduct unbecoming an officer” involving the OVI arrest, a December letter signed by Ohio Department of Public Safety Director Thomas Stickrath states.

The firing came fewer than two weeks after Shockey dropped an attempt in Miamisburg Municipal Court to suppress his arrest outside a West Carrollton bar, as well as his comments to police, records show.

Shockey was cited for OVI, failure to control and hit-skip on private property in connection to a crash, West Carrollton police records show.

On July 23, police responded to Sparky’s Lounge off Ohio 725 around 2:45 p.m. after receiving the report of a crash. Witnesses told police Shockey had left the scene in his white Ford F-150 after he was accused of striking a maroon Jaguar, a report showed.

Police investigated, saw an F-150 enter the parking lot and the truck had damage and “red/maroon transfer paint” on it, records show.

The driver of the pickup, later identified as Shockey, walked toward police with his shorts unbuttoned and unzipped, the report stated.

“There was a very strong odor of an alcoholic beverage,” police wrote in the report. “Shockey’s speech was mumbled and slurred. His eyes were bloodshot and glassy. He was unsteady on his feet.”

At that time, Shockey was placed on leave without pay after the charges, the state patrol said. He was reinstated fewer than two weeks later after he was granted limited driving privileges by a judge, court records show.

RELATED: Ohio State Highway Patrol fires Dayton trooper after OVI arrest

TERMS OF RE-INSTATEMENT

Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper David G. Shockey has agreed to:

•Be assigned to the Piqua post and agree not to transfer to the Dayton post for five years.

•Have a valid Ohio driver’s license upon returning to work.

•Not violate rules involving conduct unbecoming an officer.

•Not violate rules for use of alcohol, which state “use of alcohol, the employee will be terminated.”

•Receive no back pay for “time he has been off, including 109-day suspension.”

•Be referred to a substance abuse treatment program with certified completion.

•Submit to random drug and alcohol screenings for five years at his cost.

SOURCE: Ohio Department of Public Safety.

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