CoreLife Eatery is targeting a December opening at Austin Landing. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Fitness centers, restaurant look to extend reach at Austin Landing

Between $2 million and $3 million is expected to be invested between CycleBar Premium Indoor Cycling, Orangetheory Fitness and CoreLife at the 142-acre mixed-use retail Miami Twp. complex as they expand their reach.

For CycleBar first-time franchise owner Steve Zubrzycki, that reach isn’t far. The Miami University grad and former LexisNexis business development executive has been familiar with the area for decades.

“We wanted to be in a place where people live, where they work, where they shop and where they come to have fun,” the Springboro resident said. “And Austin Landing really has all of that. We looked around at a number of different places and we’re very happy to settle on Austin Landing.”

The Cincinnati-based CycleBar has 70 locations in at least 13 states. But Zubrzycki said he looks forward to a September opening in space on Rigby Road that was formerly occupied by Booksellers.

CycleBar will offer a 1,000 square foot, 48-bike fitness theater with large screens “where participants are taken through a 50-minute, high-energy ride,” he said.

The facility will include locker rooms and a community room, and help foster business partnerships while working with civic and charitable organizations, Zubrzycki.

After a three-week grand opening offering free rides, CycleBar will feature “recurring themed events” that “provides us an opportunity to partner with local businesses,” he said.

Also locating in space formerly occupied by Booksellers will be Orangetheory Fitness, a chain started in Florida in 2010 and has about 800 franchises sold, officials said.

Amy Bassel will operate the Austin Landing site, which will join Southwest Ohio sites now open in West Chester Twp., Mason and the Cincinnati suburb of Oakley.

By the time it opens – likely early 2018 – will be her eighth franchise, where classes “focuses on endurance, power and strength,” she said.

“What we offer is a 60-minute, full-body workout, all run by a personal coach and you wear a heart-rate monitor so you can take your progress throughout the class,” she said.

Treadmills and rowers play key roles in the members workouts, Bassel said. “Another core stabilizer that we like to concentrate on is the TRX.

“What sets us apart is the efficiency in getting that full body workout in 60 minutes or less and the output of the heart rate monitors,” she said.

“The reason we’re called Orangetheory is to try to get you in that orange and red zone for at least 12 minutes, so then you burn extra calories throughout your day,” Bassel added.

When the CoreLife Eatery opens late this year or early next in a yet-to-be built building on Innovation Drive, it will be the second in the Dayton market, as one is expected to open at The Cornerstone of Centerville this fall.

It has 11 locations in Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsylvania and New York since starting in Syracuse earlier this decade, said Stephen Donnelly, CoreLife public relations director.

“Based on all of the demographics and research that we did, we felt that this particular market would be a really great one for CoreLife Eatery and one that would be well embraced,” he said.

“The whole concept behind CoreLife Eatery is a healthy option that tastes good and its affordable and that’s what really has helped the brand to grow tremendously because it’s hard to find that combination,” Donnelly added.

Menu offers create-your-own grain and vegetable bowls, soups, grass-fed chicken and steak, and organic tofu. Customers can create their own “green bowl,” with options like Sriracha ginger roasted tofu, kale Caesar chicken, spicy ginger steak, Mediterranean, and chicken cobb.

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