Lifelong subscriber had paper sent to him in Germany barracks

Fred Peckolt has been a lifelong subscriber since 1947 when he began working as a paper boy for the Dayton Daily News. STAFF PHOTO / SARAH FRANKS

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Fred Peckolt has been a lifelong subscriber since 1947 when he began working as a paper boy for the Dayton Daily News. STAFF PHOTO / SARAH FRANKS

Whether on his porch in downtown Miamisburg in 2019, or in the Army barracks in Germany in 1955, Fred Peckolt has been reading the Dayton Daily News most of his life.

Peckolt began his subscription to the Dayton Daily in 1947 when he started his paper route. Between 20 plus years as a firefighter, time spent as a paramedic and three years in the Army, Peckolt still emphasizes how important the role of paper boys and girls has been to the free press.

“Even as a paper boy, you were working for the Dayton Daily News,” Peckolt said. “When you work for somebody, if you mess up, you put a poor image on them, not just yourself.”

When Peckolt was stationed in Germany in 1955, his grandmother insisted on continuing his newspaper reading habits even overseas and would send him the paper every day.

“It was something from home besides the “Stars and Stripes” (Armed Forces newspaper). In Germany in 1955, it was still tore up quite a bit. It was nice to have a paper from home. It kept you in touch with home. You’d have some guys say ‘Hey let me read it too, because I miss home too.’ It was something different than what the government was putting out. … You read and you keep in contact with where you’re from. You’d read and say ‘Oh I know him or I know her!’ … I’d get done with it, they’d (fellow soldiers) take it and you’d see it scattered all over the barracks when they were done reading.”

After serving in the Army, Peckolt worked at NCR and then for 20 years as a firefighter and paramedic on Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Many of the fire safety articles Peckolt authored even made it to publication in the Dayton Daily News.

“We’d say, hey let’s save lives through education,” Peckolt said. “It’s better than going in there and have to drag them out. … It was a good job.”


To finish the 120th year of the Dayton Daily News this month we are featuring stories of some of our lifelong subscribers. Read them all at DaytonDailyNews.com

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