Tuttle, Pence win Clark County races

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Caption
Clark County voters went to polls Tuesday as voted for president and several local issues.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Clark County voters have elected a new clerk of Courts for the first time in nearly four decades, selecting Republican Melissa Tuttle over incumbent Democrat Ron Vincent, according to final, unofficials results Tuesday.

Tuttle, a local attorney, said technology in the office has lagged under Vincent’s watch and said voters believed it was time for a change. However, she said Vincent has served the county well during his tenure and thanked him for his service.

Voters also re-elected Republican Nancy Pence for Clark County Recorder. Pence has served the office for 28 years. She defeated Janet Oberlin, her Democratic challenger.

Residents in Clark County voted to elect Melissa Tuttle as the first new clerk of courts in almost four decades, and re-elected Nancy Pence to serve as Clark County recorder, according to final, unofficial results Tuesday.

Tuttle, a Republican challenger, soundly defeated longtime incumbent Ron Vincent, who had served as Clark County Clerk of Courts for nearly three decades. A local attorney, Tuttle had argued the office lagged in technology under Vincent, and said she would bring changes to make accessing records easier for residents, attorneys and other court staff.

She said Vincent had served the county well for years, but voters thought it was time for a change.

“I worked extremely hard and tried to show my dedication for the community,” Tuttle said Tuesday night. “The results paid off, and the community has spoken that for the first time in 40 years we have a new clerk of courts. I’m completely humbled and appreciate of this job.”

Vincent, the Democratic incumbent, had served in the office since 1977 and argued that experience would provide stability to the office. Among other duties, the clerk’s office is responsible for filing and retaining court records, and ensuring residents and attorneys have access to the files.

Pence, the Republican incumbent, has served as recorder for the past 28 years and will serve another term.

During the election, she argued her service and experience for more than a quarter-century in office would make her the best candidate for the seat. Despite her long time in office, Pence said she has been able to keep technology in the recorder’s office up-to-date.

“I take it very seriously,” Pence said of her job. “I’m at work every day and do my job. (Voters) see me and they know that I’m there.”

Oberlin, her challenger, had argued she could bring a fresh set of eyes to the office and more energy to the position. If elected, Oberlin had said her goal was to make residents more aware of other services the office can provide, including living wills.