Montgomery County to distribute $6.6 million in coronavirus aid to local communities

ajc.com

An additional $6.6 million in coronavirus relief funds will be distributed among Montgomery County communities, with Dayton to receive more than $4.1 million, according to Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith.

Montgomery County received the emergency aid after the Ohio Controlling Board approved $175 million in additional funds for local state governments.

ExploreMore than 1,000 Ohioans part of promising COVID-19 vaccine research: Where it stands

“I am glad to see that the Ohio Controlling Board has made further funding available to jurisdictions across the state,” said Keith. “This funding will be critical in helping Montgomery recover from the economic impact of the COVID-19 virus.”

The $6.6 million will be divided between 29 communities in the county, with Dayton receiving more than 60%.

The communities receiving the next largest amounts include:

  • Kettering: $391,000
  • Huber Heights: $265,000
  • Riverside: $180,000
  • Trotwood: $174,000
  • Centerville: $170,000

The funding must be used to on unexpected costs as a result of the pandemic. It cannot be used to pay employees’ salaries or to make up for lost revenue, Keith said.

The aid will be distributed based off a formula created by the Montgomery County Budget Commission each year.

On Sept. 2, the Ohio Senate approved a new coronavirus relief bill that, if signed by Gov. Mike DeWine and passed by the Ohio House, would provide another $650 million in federal relief funding for local governments.

ExploreCollege coronavirus cases in Ohio contribute to county alert status

“My office is ready to distribute funds from Senate Bill 357 as soon as possible,” said Keith. “The Ohio House must act quickly to allow our communities to put this money to use before the October 15 deadline.”

All CARES Act funds must be spent by Oct. 15. Any unspent funds will be returned to the auditor’s office to be distributed to communities that spent all of their CARES funds. Redistribution would be proportional to the population of those communities, according to the auditor’s office.