BBB warns job seekers about employment scams

John North, president, Dayton Better Business Bureau. CONTRIBUTED
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John North, president, Dayton Better Business Bureau. CONTRIBUTED

Finding a job can be a challenging task, and scammers know it.

Better Business Bureau warns job seekers that not all job postings are legitimate. Some may misrepresent services, offer outdated or fictitious jobs or charge high upfront fees for services that may not lead to a job.

Last year, there were over 1,300 complaints across the U.S., Canada and Mexico from consumers regarding employment services. Scammers use a variety of tactics to target students, graduates and out-of-work adults looking for jobs.

BBB shares these warning signs of employment scams:

Offer a guaranteed job: Scammers may claim they have a guaranteed job waiting for you if you pay a fee for certification, training materials, classes or other expenses. Once you pay, the job doesn't exist. Employers should never ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

Request for personal information: Never give out your credit card or bank account information to unfamiliar companies. Scammers often ask for driver's licenses, passports or other means of identification to verify your identity.

"Previously undisclosed" government job: Information on any available federal job is free to the public on usajobs.gov. Never believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal service job.

"Personal" invitations: Scammers send out a mass e-mail claiming to have seen your resume on the Internet and used it to match you with a job. They will ask you to fill out an online application to gain access to your personal information.

Generic job title: Some positions are more likely to be scams than others. Be wary of secret shopper, caregiver, customer service representative or other jobs with generic titles.

"On-the-spot" offers: You may be an excellent candidate for job offers, but watch out for offers made without an interview. A legitimate company will hold interviews before hiring a candidate.

If a job looks suspicious, search for it online or call the company it is associated with. When searching for a job by using the help of employment services, check the business out by visiting bbb.org or calling (937) 222-5825 or (800) 776-5301. BBB can also provide a list of BBB Accredited employment firms.

John North is president of the Dayton Better Business Bureau.

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