Dayton manufacturers ID top concerns

Finding the right workers and controlling costs are among the top worries that Dayton Region Manufacturers Association members have, according to a just-released survey from DRMA. In this 2015 photo, a production manager demonstrates a CNC multi-axis mill turn machine at DRMA’s annual trade show. JIM WITMER/STAFF

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Finding the right workers and controlling costs are among the top worries that Dayton Region Manufacturers Association members have, according to a just-released survey from DRMA. In this 2015 photo, a production manager demonstrates a CNC multi-axis mill turn machine at DRMA’s annual trade show. JIM WITMER/STAFF

Finding skilled workers tops the list of concerns that Dayton Region Manufacturers Association members have, according to a new survey.

The association of local manufacturers surveys members each year to better understand their concerns. A “shortage of skilled workers” topped the list for worries this year, according to a release Friday from the DRMA.

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“Technically skilled and productive workers are in very short supply in the Dayton region,” the statement said. “Over 87 percent of members responding to the survey identified this is a top issue, and this has been the No. 1 issue for the last four years.

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“It is essential that a highly trained and skilled work force is available for manufacturing companies to be able to meet the demand for goods and services and to be able to offer high quality, high paying jobs that will assure a prosperous economy,” the organization added.

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The other top concerns included: Cost of health care, international trade, corporate taxes, government regulations and business sustainability.

“Due to the modest growth of the economy, DRMA members are concerned with increasing their sales revenue while maintaining current profit margins,” the association said in its statement. “Because of competitive pricing pressures and the increased costs of doing business (such as proposed increases in the minimum wage), margin compression is a concern at all levels of the supply chain.”

DRMA says it represents 2,364 companies with more than 114,000 employees in a 14-county Western Ohio region. Together, those companies represent a $6.1 billion annual payroll.

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