Battle Sight Technologies was awarded a phase I contract at the Air Force s inaugural Pitch Day competition and received more than $65,000 on the spot to commercialize chemiluminescence products.

Dayton tech company lands contract award

A Dayton tech company has won a U.S. Air Force contest and a contract award.

Battle Sight Technologies was awarded a phase I contract at the Air Force’s inaugural Pitch Day competition and received more than $65,000 “on the spot” to commercialize “chemiluminescence” products.

The products aid communication in low-light and no-light conditions. An early Battle Sight product was a reusable glow stick that warfighters and emergency responders can use to write.

The writing is invisible to people without night vision equipment — allowing military, law enforcement and emergency management personnel with night vision equipment to communicate.

RELATED: Invisible communication? This Dayton company has a product for that.

“Additional follow-on funding will be made available to the company in the next 90 days for a contract total of over $165,000,” Battle Sight said in its announcement released Wednesday.

The Air Force business pitch competition was open to American start-ups and small businesses that are more than 50 percent owned by U.S. citizens or permanent resident aliens. Participating companies were also expected to have fewer than 500 employees.

Battle Sight Technologies is a veteran-owned business rooted in technology licensed from the Air Force Research Lab, which is based at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

“This is real validation that what we’re doing is meaningful to warfighters on the front lines,” said Battle Sight Technologies President and Miamisburg native Nick Ripplinger.

The company has six employees.

Last month, Battle Sight also signed a two-year research and development agreement with the Naval Surface Warfare Center, said Troy Carter a senior writer and editor for TechLink, a Bozeman, Mont.-based program that connects civilian businesses with military technologies ripe for commercialization.

The Navy agreement allows Ripplinger to test his chemiluminescence product within a land mine simulator at a naval center at Panama City, Fla.

“I’m super excited. It’s such an amazing opportunity to be able to grow our business while supporting the greatest customer in the world, which is the American Warfighter,” Ripplinger said.

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