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Dayton tech firm launches Dayton tech firm

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“Today, replacing just one component in complex embedded systems found in cars, planes, industrial systems, etc. is a painstaking manual process of integration and testing,” Galois said in a release. “Tangram Flex technology allows engineers to quickly reconfigure existing systems and to re-use components across different systems.”

As “smart tooling” grows in knowledge, the company said, it becomes able to automatically integrate components into larger systems with limited human guidance. The technology provides “strong guarantees of system safety and correctness, turning previously monolithic, outdated systems into flexible, modular, and secure modern platforms,” Galois said.

The initial focus of Tangram Flex will be to help the Department of Defense hold off cyber attackers and to make existing equipment more adaptable, the company said in its announcement.

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With roots in Portland, Ore., Galois is a computer science company interested in deepening relationships with federal customers and launching work with autonomous vehicles. The company opened its Dayton offices last year.

The new technology is based on decades of research, the business said.

“Despite all the advancements in technology to date, it often takes years and millions of dollars to change one small component in a system, whether it is on an manufacturing industrial system or on a fighter jet,” John Launchbury, Tangram Flex chief technology officer, said in the company’s statement. “Our technology enables organizations to be more flexible and responsive, quickly adapting their systems when change is needed.”

Today, Galois has about three full-time employees in Dayton, while Tangram has seven, a spokesman said. By the end of the year, Tangram should have about 15 to 20 full-time employees, he said.

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