Fifth Third awards $75K total to Dayton non-profits

The Fifth Third Center sits at the southwest corner of Main and Third Streets in downtown Dayton. LISA POWELL / STAFF
Caption
The Fifth Third Center sits at the southwest corner of Main and Third Streets in downtown Dayton. LISA POWELL / STAFF

Two Dayton-area organizations received Fifth Third Bank community grants.

Dubbed “Strengthening Our Communities grants,” the bank paid a collective $75,000 went to the Homeownership Center of Greater Dayton and to the Small Business Development Center at Wright State University.

The Home Ownership Center received $25,000 and the Small Business Development Center received $50,000, a bank spokeswoman said.

The Fifth Third Foundation announced a total of $2.5 million in grants from its “Strengthening Our Communities” fund in 2017. The grants go to nonprofit programs that support home ownership, affordable housing, small business development and financial stability for individuals and families, Fifth Third said.

“The Strengthening Our Community grants are important because they result in people’s lives being positively changed, and they allow organizations the opportunity to expand their reach,” Heidi Jark, managing director of the Fifth Third Foundation, said in an announcement.

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The fund in 2017 had an impact on more than 355 people through neighborhood revitalization projects and nearly 5,200 people who received workforce development and financial education services, the foundation said.

More than 1,640 households were assisted with resources for home repair and rehab programs that helped senior citizens maintain their homes and through homeowner assistance programs that helped people achieve ownership.

Nearly 2,200 more people were helped by economic development programs, including technical assistance and micro-lending for small businesses, according to the foundation.

Awards are made four times per year. Grant awards begin at $25,000 and are for a one-year period.

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